Why a newspaPeR?

      49 Comments on Why a newspaPeR?

The newspaper, to paraphrase Monty Python, is not quite dead. To hear Robert Zimmerman, partner at Zimmerman/Edelson, Inc. tell it, the printed paper is still an essential tool in the public relations practitioners’ kit.  Zimmerman made this point to the students attending last week’s conference staged by Hofstra’s Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) chapter.  He noted that because the Internet allows us to synthesize our news before it reaches us, we avoid seeing countless stories and photos that would enhance our knowledge of the world–and even the neighborhoods–around us.  Many of us, especially young people, are only reading slivers of the news from self-selected categories.  We also miss stories we might have enjoyed because they aren’t pre-defined as news we care about.

Robert Zimmerman makes a point at the PRSSA conference.

Robert Zimmerman makes a point at the PRSSA conference.

For example, I wouldn’t set my online New York Times categories to include the style section.  But because I get the printed paper delivered, I spotted an article today on how parents are defining success for their kids who are going to college, an article I enjoyed and would not have seen otherwise.  By flipping through Saturday’s Newsday, I found out that Osama Bin Laden’s son-in-law is on trial in New York, Bill Clinton has endorsed gay marriage and Justin Timberlake is hosting Saturday Night Live.  I might have missed some of that important information (my wife loves J.T.!) if I had only read my pre-determined news feeds.”It’s true many younger people get their news online — which for the most part means the headlines — and don’t want to spend the time to read in-depth articles as so many generations did before,” wrote Michael Russnow in a Feb. 19 Huffington Post blog.  He added, “…websites do not offer the same quality that comes in the form of a three-dimensional journal.  Most online articles are not too substantive…”

He’s right, and so is Robert Zimmerman.   When we read online exclusively, we’ve chosen to miss a lot.  Good PR people can’t afford be so selective.  Knowing what goes on around you is helpful, necessary and expected.  Printed newspapers still matter.  Your thoughts?

49 thoughts on “Why a newspaPeR?

  1. Erica Barnes

    I suppose today’s world is so obsessed with learning information as quickly as possible that they forget how important the QUALITY of that information is. I am often disappointed with the brevity of online articles, yet don’t take the time out of my day to read the paper. I completely agree with the bit about selective reading, as well. The internet is so big that we have to search for whatever news we want, while print journalism offers easy exposure to all forms of news.

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  2. Alex Packer

    The American attention span is ever decreasing, I’m not proud of it, who would be? But this is something that can not be overlooked. Since I’ve come to college and purchased a smart-phone my media consumption habits have changed completely. I now get all my information on the go, whenever I have a free moment to check the latest updates. I often begin reading with the intent of finishing an article, but my class begins, or my train reaches it’s stop I put the phone away and never return to that story.

    As much as I hate to say it, I feel that it is now the responsibility of print outlets to make the adjustments to their content and formatting that may regain readership.

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  3. Jeremy Beck

    I agree that there is definitely more useful and perhaps interesting news in print than we generally get online due to customization. However, after reading much of these posts it seems that people are going to remain consuming all their media (including news) at a fast pace which doesn’t often lead to leisurely browsing a newspaper. There are certainly pros to reading a newspaper, as you mentioned above, but the trend of information consumption keeps veering towards quick and easy rather than slower and perhaps more informative.

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  4. Mia D'Angelo

    When I first hear newspaper, I think outdated. Yet, after the recent events like the Boston Bombing, and this article of course, my view has changed drastically. I feel that the newspaper is a matter of quality over quantity. Online sources are now in the masses, information is constantly coming in and out and therefore the margin of error is enormous. In contrast, the newspaper may be less frequent, but in most cases, much more reliable. Saying no to any information source in PR is a foolish move. Therefore, I feel that the newspaper is still an effective and necessary tool, especially for those in the communications field.

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  5. aciardullo

    I get most of my news from Twitter now and sometimes online. If I was to sit down and actually read a newspaper, I much rather have the print version than read it online. Due to all of our “busy lives” it is hard to find the time to actually sit down and read the paper. Getting the little pieces of information from Twitter and other social media outlets keeps us informed in a quick and easy way.

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  6. Diane R

    In my opinion, printed newspapers are more effective and easier to read then online newspapers and would be better for PR professionals. However, everything is online these days, but it also makes newspapers more accessible because all it takes is a few clicks on a computer or phone to read an article. I get a lot of my news from posts I see on Facebook and Twitter but I hope to take Mr. Zimmerman’s advice and start reading an actual printed newspaper on a daily/weekly basis.

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  7. kerrischreiber

    The problem for this generation is that we have access to Internet and other immediate forms of communication. Because of that we have selective attention and choose what we want to read based on our interests. The goal of a PR person to work with the new non-newspaper reading generation should be to find out the interests of these people and offer them new forms of information. They can offer new information by posting a link with a headline to another article right after the one these people are reading that might interest them. That is something most news sites use but there will always be curious people who will keep looking for more news, and then those who only want what they care about.

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  8. Kellianne

    I wish that I read more newspapers on actual paper. Although it is easier to download them onto my iPad, so I can have it on the go, I have heard that reading an actual newspaper is important. Every time someone tells me to read an actual newspaper, I tell myself I am going to change my habits. I have yet to do that and I think it will eventually hurt me. It is hard to get newspapers while at school besides the ones offered to students for free, so hopefully this summer I will get into reading hard newspapers.

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  9. LucieSorel

    Printed newspapers are much better and easier to read than online ones. They newspapers you can hold, and touch are organized in a specific format for reader enjoyment. Papers are easy to understand and give the reader the most important news of the day. If one only reads online news, they might miss out on the most important and pressing issues because their attention is focused in the wrong place. It is easy to miss things when you are able to pick and choose exactly what your eyes see.

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  10. ejm1059

    For me this is like the whole debate between kindles and actual books. I read faster when I use a Kindel but there is nothing better than the feeling of turning a page. I would hat to see newspapers fade away.

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  11. Lola Odejobi

    I agree that the newspaper is very important especially for those seeking a career in PR and Journalism. My dad used to subscribe to different newspapers and he’ll tell me to read them. When you get your news online or on social media sites, you are only reading what interests you. With a newspaper, you can read it through and read stories that you would have skipped.

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  12. pr180kristen

    I admit that I rarely ever open a newspaper. I follow local news stations on Facebook and have newsday and the New York Times apps for my phone. I agree that reading an actual newspaper would be better for PR professionals, but that’s for now.

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  13. Kneekiki

    I find that when I am looking through my random websites to get news online I only read the headlines. It is weird that I do it but I know I am not the only one. When I do have an actual newspaper in hand I will go through the articles and skim through until I find something that interests me or I think may be important for my own knowledge. I like to read so I think it is terrible that I do not indulge in the newspaper and what it has to offer. My father works for the New York Post and Wall Street Journal so they are always readily available, sad but true I may be the one person in my household that reads the newspaper the least.

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  14. Shurida Lundi

    My father used to stress to me about reading the newspaper all the time and I would just ignore him but as a potential PR professional I can see why it is needed to read the paper frequently. You do need to know a little bit of everything in the PR world because it makes you more knowledgeable and you stand out more. I get my news from Twitter and Facebook but hopefully I will expand my horizons and start reading the paper more and more. I have to find a way to make it more interesting to me because certain papers bore me.

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  15. Carrie Walker

    I must admit that I am one of those people that just pays attention to the headlines and does not bother to read full articles if they are not of my immediate interest. However, after reading this post and also being convinced by Mr. Zimmerman, I can see how reading the actual newspaper is neccessary for the PR professional. My knowledge of other things taking place in the world would probably expand if I take the time to read the orignal newspaper from time to time. From now on I think I will start.

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  16. Hunter F. (@kristintellsall)

    I guess in a time that I have been taught to read online news/ press I personally think printed press. Emails, texts, phone calls make it so obsolete and unnecessary. Especially in the fashion industry. Fashion blogs and websites dominate public relations professionals attention. Fashion mags are starting to dwindle and unless you’re one of the major publications it’s hard to make a splash in the print magazine industry.

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  17. Shirley

    I agree that we need to keep up with print media and not solely rely on websites. All i get from my twitter and facebook is news that I liked and am interested in but i get to read about other topics that I would have never otherwise read about or even glanced at if i weren’t reading the newspapers every morning for my internship.

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  18. davery1

    I agree that readers will often read more selecected stories and I also believe that print is still essential to readers. Although there are stories that are just informatonal and useful in the time of need. Not everything we read we are goin to agree with and accept as news but we can form our own opinion towards a particular topic and build from it.

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  19. ccorte6

    One would think that someone like me who is such an advocate against all digital books would be reading printed newspapers. Its sad to say that I do not often pick up a physical copy of the newspaper; I do receive my news in online forms either through the news websites themselves or twitter feed. I do believe that I should change that habit because I fully agree that I am missing valuable information. Especially as a person in PR, it is detrimental to only read what interests you at first glance. This stops us from learning, as we put ourselves into “echo chambers” constantly hearing what we want to hear and already know. You can’t possibly expect to be able to fully understand the public with this type of reading. I am going to make a habit of picking up that physical print copy and opening my mind up to new things.

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  20. christineneumann

    While I have come to love the convenience of the news apps on my phone, you could say that a love of the newspaper has been ingrained into me. Everyday at my internship at CBS the producer of the World News Roundup (which turns 75 on Wednesday) starts with a minimum of 4 newspapers. Our professional in residence at WRHU has at least two on his desk at all times. Being around such strong mentors, its hard not to follow suit. And if that’s not enough this list is probably want makes it for me, http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffbercovici/2012/04/16/forget-that-survey-heres-why-journalism-is-the-best-job-ever/. Newspapers will never die as long as journalists exist, and that’s just fine by me.

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  21. blarouche

    I agree. I love to read the news online because not only is right at my fingertips, but I can also pick and choose what I read. That being said, I also enjoy sitting down in the morning and reading the newspaper with my breakfast because I do hear about more of what is going on. While I think that the Internet is great for quickly getting the news, I think print paper is still the way to go to get different types of news.

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  22. Amanda Daley

    I completely agree with this post. Although I often find myself looking at stories on online publications like The New York Times, and entertainment sites, I still understand the value of a newspaper. Technology changes the way we live our lives and I feel many people are looking for quick and easy ways to find news that they can filter to what they are interested in. I still enjoy picking up a newspaper from time to time, because I still feel that print journalism and newspapers is one of the best ways for people to well-rounded and knowledgeable in all different areas.

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  23. Brenna Harran

    Agreeing with you that many younger people get their news online, I tend to read stories daily on the internet. Almost every morning I read Newsday online. When I search different websites, I see news headlines for only some types of stories. I do not go out of my way to read political news, world news, etc. (much of which that matters). I admit I do have a narrow focus when viewing the news. The only time I can say I really hold a physical copy of news is a magazine, which is more gossip than news really, and when I am home. My parents get Newsday delivered to our house daily and that is how they view their news, not so much online. I definitely think this post is true. Young people do get their news online more often and if you don’t go out of your way to look for it, you miss out on different categories and types of news.

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  24. Jenny Rowe

    If newspapers were not so expensive, I would absolutely read them every day. Fortunately there are free apps for the most popular articles from CNN or the NY Times that you can read daily, which are vital to college students in my opinion. Reading off of a screen isn’t ideal, but at least some of us are reading! A lot of this generation does not even bother to unless it is required for class.

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  25. Lauren Ciuzio

    I’m not going to lie…I always go to the internet for information before a newspaper. You are right, the internet allows us to be selective about what we read. I usually read entertainment stories, and skim the main headlines daily. Why? I don’t really have time to go out, buy a newspaper, and sit down to read it. I will admit, relying on the internet for all of our news is lazy. I also get a daily email from this service called “theskimm” which e-mails you the top ten news stories going on in the World every morning. This is a quick service that allows me to become up to date with what is going on in the World in under five minutes, on my phone, which is convenient.

    It’s also interesting my job stopped selling newspapers about two years ago. I have people ask me everyday if we sell newspapers. Weird.

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  26. Kelly Schnitzer

    For a while, when the internet really started to take off, there were whispers about print newspapers going extinct. However, we’ve seen these pubilcations’ tenacity in the face expanding technology and they’ve proven to us all that print is here for the long haul.

    Personally, I find reading the newspaper online a tedious task. I would much rather pick up a print newspaper because I like that dusty feeling of the wood pulp between my finger tips and the stale smell of the ink. I find that many people enjoy the experience of reading a tangible paper over that of an online edition.

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  27. bluelenex

    This is pretty accurate, I admit but there are a few other aspects that are not being factored in. I know in my case and a lot of my fellow students’ cases, we would love to sit down and read the newspaper, but there simply aren’t enough hours in the day to do so. I’m a reader, but when I’m reading anything these days it’s something having to do with school because there is no time to read about the world or for pleasure or anything else. Young people read the short snippets from Twitter and social media because that’s the only way we can hope to get any sense of what’s going on in the world since there is no time to sift through the articles upon articles in the newspapers. There just isn’t enough time with all of the papers and tests and reading assignments.

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  28. Brittni Hicks

    I am honestly one of the biggest offenders of tailoring my news to my interests. When I visit nytimes.com I check the fashion column first, then I skim the headlines to determine which articles I will actually read. At best I get through one entire non-fashion or entertainment article a day. Even the news I get on my phone, the NY Times iPhone app, I barely read more than the headlines and short summary offered with each article. Sometimes during my commute to my internship I find a small window to read an article or two, but not nearly enough.

    The newspaper, however, is absolutely still relevant and essential in daily life. I do not subscribe to a news paper, but whenever I can get my hands on a copy from the CV Starr lobby, I grab one. Finding the time to actually read it proves to be the hard part.

    I think more and more people are turning to digital news because of its convenience. Everyone I know is always so on the go, there is hardly enough time in a day to complete everything that needs to be completed, let alone read a newspaper.

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  29. aunaturalenyc

    I am not going to argue that newspapers are dead, rather that newspapers are changing. Online news is definitely taking over print news in my opinion. The newspapers’ websites probably have a lot more traffic than the print versions. Online has just simply become easier. Readers are evolving along with technology, and the media outlets need to do so too.

    People my age are more likely to find their news by following the NY Times on twitter rather than reading their whole newspaper. But of course just as Zimmerman said, there will always be some old fashion people out there. It will always lay down to preference.

    -J

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    1. jmorosoff Post author

      I wouldn’t call newspaper readers “old fashioned.” The point is that a newspaper’s layout, perhaps more than its content, often will inspire people to see–and then read–articles and photos they may not have seen by selecting catageories of online news. And my guess is that your statement that there’s more web traffic on a newspaper’s web site than the print version is not correct — at least, not yet. It’s something worth researching.

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  30. stevenpmorin

    I agree that reading news online makes a person’s news more defined. However, not reading news online doesn’t mean that someone will read from a newspaper. I feel that if a person were to stop reading online news, they would simply receive less news altogether.

    Newspapers are, in fact, dying. The process of printing and delivering is simply too slow. What is not dying is journalists. There is still a need for an in-depth report of a news story to validate the initial buzz on Twitter.

    An investigative person actually interested in a story will retain their interest for the next day when the report comes out. The issue with the news media today isn’t that social media is too fast; the issue is that social media makes stories too brief.

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  31. Beckett Mufson

    This post is mostly right; it is important to consume a wide variety of news content. The physical newspaper is one way of organizing a bunch of stories in such a way that people can read about a lot of different things. “Read the newspaper every day” is a good heuristic rule to get a diverse picture of the world, but the mistake that this line of thought makes is polarizing Internet reading and newspaper reading as intrinsically tied to the way some people are currently consuming them.

    Using broad filter terms, such as “news” or “music,” and frequenting aggregate sites like reddit (which allows for a lot of customization, but also a lot of exploration), the Internet can offer a lot more perspectives a lot more efficiently than a single newspaper. Likewise, one can easily skip over articles in a newspaper.

    This post treats the newspaper like it’s some form of black magic that whisks away people’s inherent short attention spans and apathy. Well it’s not. People who want to expand their perspective will read outside of their comfort zone. People who only want to consume content that agrees with them will remain in the dark. This is a people problem, not a media problem.

    However, it’s a problem that the Internet is hard at work solving. Websites like Reddit and Medium are changing the way people look at articles, and the people of the Internet are getting tired of one click wonders. Right now Twitter and Tumblr, with the help of the current click-based business model, encourages short form, ADD content consumption. But the times they are a-changin’.

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    1. jmorosoff Post author

      I hope you’re right about these changes. but you’re also right about people and their short attention span. The point that Mr. Zimmerman and I are making is that a newspaper’s layout, perhaps more than its content, often will inspire people to read outside of their comfort zone because the reader will see articles and photos they may not have seen by selecting catageories of online news.

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  32. nikkigyftopoulos

    There is no doubt that a physical newspaper is still essential in everyday life. It is especially important for public relations people to stay up with the current news of the day, and reading a newspaper is a crucial step to completing this task. I found Robert Zimmerman’s comment about the importance of the physical newspaper as one of the most influential and eye-opening remarks of the whole PRSSA conference. It really demonstrated why newspapers are still alive and should still be read. As a young adult, I am crammed for time and constantly getting my news from convenient online sources. However, I find it very true that by getting news online, I choose what I want to read based on my interests. If I picked up a physical newspaper, I would be attracted to articles and headlines that I may have never seen before. This is the true essence and importance of reading newspapers. It gives us a well-rounded view of all news, not just selected news. As a PR major, I need to be aware and knowledgable of all current events. Robert Zimmerman’s remark at the conference really impacted me and I have started to make a conscious effort to read physical newspapers in addition to getting news online.

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  33. AndreaRebello

    Unfortunately, I am one of those people who get all of their news and information via Internet. However, I do not believe that the newspaper is completely dead. Although the use of the newspaper is declining each year, I believe that it is a valuable source of news because of the wide range in variety of information it offers. In order to be a good PR professional, it is essential that you are always updated with what is going out in the world that we live in today. In order to do that, the newspaper is definitely a must, and should always be taken into consideration as a source of news. It is proven that the Internet filters the information that is shows us, the newspaper does not have the ability to do that, making it the best way to obtain all types of information.

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  34. alexis gionesi

    I almost never read the newspaper, much of the news that I am knowledgable of unfortunately comes from online news or even twitter and facebook. I do agree that because of online news we are missing a lot, but I do think that one day newspapers will no longer exist.

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  35. EMC

    Exclusively selecting what we want is exactly what the Internet allows us to do. It is a serious downside to getting your news solely from the pages of the web. I treasure picking up a copy of the WSJ when I have time during the busy school day. It lets me sit down, relax, and most importantly, FOCUS on the important events in the world. I can still be entertained, as I am by the Internet, but my attention is more focused and my mind more absorbent when I can physically hold the paper and read articles that seem interesting, possibly slightly boring, but still very important. It gives you an edge to be more informed than those who skip out.

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  36. Helen Masha

    I certainly agree that the newspaper is not dead. For me personally I get most of my news from newspapers and enjoy the way they are set up and the abundance of information they are amount to give. Online newspapers and magazines I feel are less appealing when they are longer and are better for the fast information on the go world. There is nothing like sitting drinking a coffee and being able to turn through the pages of a newspaper. There is also something to be said with the amount of news that comes from all over the world that a newspaper provides. Hopefully the newspaper can hang in there!

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  37. gionnacerniglia

    I will admit, I am one of the people who read their news online. I even have a New York Times App on my phone where I get all my news updates and I also follow NYT on Twitter. However, I completely agree, newspapers are not dead. The newspaper itself is much more valuable than some account on Twitter or some app on any Iphone. In fact, I still get the newspaper sent to my house at school everyday, I just choose not to read it because I feel it is just more convenient to read it on my phone when I’m on the go.

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  38. Marissa Dombkowski

    I agree entirely. To me, there is nothing like having the actual hard copy to flip through. I also agree that when I have the full document, I catch things that I might not have seen otherwise. This is so important because like stated before, a PR practitioner must be well-rounded and know about everything that is going on in the news. Another strength for the print version of a newspaper can be seen through the example of a local newspaper. My hometown is extremely small, and I get most of my news and find out what is going on in my area through my local newspaper. I don’t think it’s as successful online. The website is very small and not every story is posted. Through the actual hard copy, I can know exactly what’s happening in my hometown and what to keep my eye on.

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  39. Ian Poulos

    I definitely agree that online publications tend to limit one’s exposure to news, but I think this is the result of how some opt to use online media. A person that subscribes to New York Times or Newsday cannot choose which section of the paper will be delivered; the entire paper comes in one package, and the reader is forced to flip through the articles to find his or her topic of interest. Although more laborious, this makes the reader acknowledge the presence of current events he or she would not have otherwise seen. Online media subverts this process by allowing the reader to choose which section he or she receives through email or some other filter – like a “Google Alert.” In reality, if a reader took the time to view the myriad of articles the online media outlets publish on their website, the exposure to material would be the same whether it was online or in print. The difference is that online media gives its audience a shortcut that many choose to utilize.

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  40. gmcillo

    I am probably one of the few who is more likely to read all genres of news on the Internet rather then in the newspaper. My home screen is AOL news because I like to be informed just in case a topic might come up in class. AOL news provides top news articles that I am more likely to read because each article come off as top page news. When I do read a newspaper I usually just read the cover story and then turn to the fashion/entertainment pages. I think I am less likely to read news articles in the paper because they do not all come across as important or urgent. Where as online all the articles are given a fair share which makes it seem that are all worth reading. For example I first heard about Ed Koch through AOL news. It was the first thing on my home screen so I figured it might be interesting to read. If my only news outlet were a newspaper I probably would have skipped right over him. A newspaper till matters but the future is in online news. If people started to adjust with the changes they could easily treat the online news just like they did with the newspaper.

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  41. Annik Spencer

    I definitely agree with you and Robert Zimmerman. As PR practitioners we have to know a little bit about everything and getting our news and information only from Twitter simply won’t cut it. Unfortunately as a college student it is hard to get my hands on a print Newspaper, but I try to go online and read the front page of the NYT everyday if I can. Also, I try to follow a variety of news, fashion, pop culture, business and PR-related Twitter accounts to further “keep me in the know.” If you can’t read a print newspaper everyday you learn to improvise!

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  42. Amanda Torres

    I completely agree with this post! We generally choose what we want to read online, where printed newspapers choose for us. Newspapers give us what they believe is most important from ALL AROUND THE WORLD. It’s good to pick up a paper once in a while and see what’s going on in the world around us. Yes, it’s nice to read blogs/online journals, but at the end of the day we aren’t going to be as cultured as we would be, if we read a newspaper more often.

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  43. Sarah Caruso

    I think that you’re definitely going to see the extinction of the printed newspaper within the next fifty or more years. This is something that is also happening with books, as ereaders continue to grow in popularity. At some point publishers are going to stop making printed books and only make electronic versions of them, and the newspapers are headed in the same direction. Young people today don’t sit down to read the paper, they go online for their news because it is faster and won’t cost them any money. And selective reading is going to happen whether you have a paper in front of you or you’re looking at a computer screen.

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  44. Claire T.

    I think my generation has grown so accustomed to reading off a screen as opposed to a page that it’s hard to show them everything they’re missing. From online news sites to textbooks available on the iPad and Kindle, the world continues to make it much more feasible to resort to advancing technology than rely on a past generation’s news standard. While I see the advantage in having everything at my fingertips, I guess I’m a bit old school in preferring to have a printed text.

    I don’t read a newspaper as often as I should, but when I do I always find myself drawn to stories I never would’ve elected to read online. I’ve come to this conclusion after years of observing my own habits, so I completely agree with what you’re saying about people tending to be more selective online. The drawback is that when I actually DO read articles online, I often find them poorly written and less informational. I end up searching for more details and a search engine and then being overwhelmed by the copious amount of articles that reiterate the same three points made in the original piece.

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  45. Sandra B

    I am personally so grateful that I work in an industry that still values newspapers. I really enjoy working with local Long Island clients who see the value in getting their information out on local papers and it is a completely different level of excitement to see the content I send out in print.

    It saddens me to realize that newspapers are a declining medium because what you said is true- reading in print is a different experience. It pushed you to actually glance through the page to find what you’re looking and often you find stories you would normally miss. And even reading the articles is more compelling because of the way its written in print over online.

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  46. janabanana12

    ***Sorry, my phone sent it and I wasn’t finished!!

    People say the paper is dead, but what Robert Zimmerman spoke about stuck out to me as well. Online news is the future, but who can resist sitting at home with a cup of coffee and flipping through the paper? I know I can’t.

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  47. janabanana12

    I am a BIG fan of online news; even though it’s true that the Internet filters out what to read, I think that a good journalist, PR person, or even just an everyday joe goes searching for articles beyond their interests.
    The only time I actually sit down and read the paper is Sunday, (or because I work at the Hofstra Chronicle, Mondays too.) While I do enjoy the quantity of news available just by flipping a page, online news is fast and convenient. Plus, I constantly receive CNN, NY Times, and Twitter updates, so even if there’s an article I’m not interested in up on the website, I will most likely check it out.
    I’ve heard

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