Millennials: Plenty to OffeR

The millennial “Girls” in HBO’s series are confused young adults. And like every generation, millennials have a mixed reputation.  They’re often viewed as feeling entitled to success; they’re mediocre writers with short attention spans and poor critical thinking skills.  They’ve been coddled by “umbrella” parents and constantly need to have their hands held.

HBO's "Girls": entitled millennials?

HBO’s “Girls”: entitled millennials?

Steve Earl of PR Week believes the 21-25 year old employee has to overcome the millennials’ reputation for feeling entitled.  In his blog post “On PR First Job Tips and Millennials,” he wrote, “First and foremost it is you that have to make career development happen, not your employer.  If you’re not driven to succeed, expect to spin your wheels for a long time.  It’s a two-way street, so don’t sit there bitching… Be ever-keen, eager to take on more responsibility and ever-ready to help others out.”

On the other hand, in a PR Week article, “Stop Bashing Millennials, Especially in PR,” Scott Signore wrote that older generations shouldn’t look down on the new generation of employees. “It’s become something of a sport for social media and business types to beat up on the youngsters joining the ranks of PR: They’re too self-absorbed…,” he wrote. “…They don’t think long-term. They feel entitled…I say knock it off with the youth-bashing, folks.”  He goes on to say, “…the younger people in our ranks continually challenge our managers, and me, to be open-minded and fluid in our approach to public relations and social media. They help keep us fresh, and a step ahead of our more complacent peers.”

While the PR industry is experiencing faster-than-average growth, there are many new graduates competing for a limited number of jobs.  Young people have to find ways to present themselves as unique and stronger than their competition.  Some will struggle to overcome their shortcomings while others are creatively brilliant and driven to succeed.  But isn’t that true of every generation?   So my note to PR’s next generation: Don’t let us baby boomers upset you; you have so much to offer.  But you’ll have to prove it, every day.  Your thoughts?

46 thoughts on “Millennials: Plenty to OffeR

  1. Erica Barnes

    I am a huge fan of “Girls,” but absolutely hate the main character, Hannah. Why? She is the embodiment of a selfish, entitled brat. She believes that everybody should dote on her, and doesn’t understand why she has such a hard time getting a lucrative job. If this is how the baby boomers think my generation acts, I can understand why they are hesitant to help us join the workplace. As Steve Earl suggests, it is our time to step up and prove ourselves in the workplace.

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  2. rcardno91

    It sounds to me that those baby boomers who are bashing the millennials are feeling a little threatened. The millennials were born online and the internet is in our blood. Plenty of baby boomers have learned to use the internet but they have not been immersed in it from birth like the millennials have. No one is entitled to anything and hard work is always the best way to achieve success, but the millennials are able to adapt to the rapidly changing world better than any previous generation. Out with the old and in with the new

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  3. Lola

    I’m only speaking for myself, but I don’t feel entitled to anything. I believe in working hard for what you want. I agree that the older generation should appreciate the younger generation’s knowledge of electronics and social media, and how we use them for PR and Journalism.

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  4. Alex Packer

    I agree wholeheartedly that America’s youth is feeling increasingly entitled to high paying jobs and luxurious lifestyles, I blame the media, but that’s not the issue here. Ever since my first lousy job at age 16 I’ve wanted nothing more than the chance to get my hands dirty in a full-time position wherever it may be. Nowadays jobs are hard to come by, offering that much more motivation to seize any opportunity that comes my way.

    So what do I say to the bashing baby-boomers? Bash away, think nothing of me, write me off completely before I even step foot in that interview, I’d love to see the look on your face when you realize how wrong you are.

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  5. Jeremy Beck

    Steve Earl of PR Week makes a decent point about career development and the importance of being driven. I just think it was misguidedly pointed at this generation in particular. The truth is any new employee, no matter what age or generation needs to be aware of the fact that nothing is handed to you and those who wait for a good thing to fall in their lap, may spend their career waiting.

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  6. Kristen Kelly

    I do not agree that we are entitled what so ever. Yes, as new generation PR professionals we have knowledge on more up to date ways to work the field, but I would never say that we feel entitled, or at least I don’t. I believe that the baby boomers and the millennials need to look to the other generation for help as both generations have different methods of doing things. No one generation should be bashing the other, especially when it comes to the work environment. Personally, I look up to my older generation of co-workers because I must learn from them to one day move up the totem poll (but for the record, I don’t feel entitled to take their position). I don’t take the “bashing” personally, but I believe it is BS and they’re just bitter. Everyone who’s looking for a job must work hard to get it, and when they do they must work hard to keep it. Never let what one says about you, your generation, or your methods of work affect who you are. I think us millennials are stronger than that anyway!

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  7. Helen Masha

    I do fully agree with the statement that we are all entitled, and if so isn’t the baby boomer generation to blame? I cannot speak for the whole millennial generation but one thing I do know is that I work hard and am aware that my future is in my own hands without the assistance of anyone else. I am a big fan of the show girls and it speaks to those who are trying to find who they are and what they want which is not just a generation thing but can apply to anyone. I think the show is a way of saying that it is okay to be uncertain and things will be okay, or at least an interesting story!

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  8. caliannfornia

    Regardless of what people say everyone needs to be driven and fight for what they want. Feeling entitled is toxic to any age. I think senior staff in the workplace should appreciate the new PR youth, and the youth should appreciate them back. I think a mutual respect needs to exist in order for both sides to get ahead and achieve a positive and beneficial experience. Bashing someone for not thinking like you is wrong, especially when they know how to use the newer technology or have more experience than you. Everyone deserves a shot, if someone wants it enough they will fight for it, and that’s the candidate you hire.

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  9. Mara Ruocco

    Every generation is going to have something to say about the following generation because there is always going to be something that makes us different. Of course I feel the need to defend the younger generation as I am a part of it. Maybe it is true, we have been fed the answers growing up and rewarded too easily, however we have many redeeming qualities. Due to social media our generation has an incredible ability to understand and connect to several people. This is something that will greatly help us in any communication field as it is important to reach all types of individuals. I also believe that our generation is a creative one and that once we are thrown into the working world we’ll be able to use our strengths and do great things. All young people believe things come easy in life until they’re knocked down and have to work their way back up.

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  10. sashmirpu

    This post is very relevant to what I’ve been learning in my classes, especially my mass media courses where we tend to discuss how millennials are portrayed. I agree with Scott Signore and his idea that our generation has fresh ideas and help the older generation to keep an open-mind. I don’t think it’s true that we do not work as hard as older generations. In fact, I think in this era where technology is everywhere, we actually don’t stop working. It is not weird nowadays to replay to a business e-mail at 10 p.m per say because you happened to receive the e-mail on your phone. Also, I feel that millenials can bring a lot to the table when it comes to our knowledge of online tools that can be very beneficial in the public relations field.

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  11. blarouche

    I think that there are people who feel like they’re entitled no matter the age group. The problem with entitled people in the younger generation is that they’ve already got their age going against them. Many people look at younger employees as being less capable because of their lack of experience instead of looking at the new ideas they can bring to the table. If someone is young they already have this mindset against them then add in that they’re entitled and don’t understand what it’s like not to have Mom and Dad holding their hand and it just creates an even more negative view of young employees. That doesn’t mean that’s what they’re like. I think that many young people understand that in order to be successful in a career and life it takes hard work. The problem is just that they’re not the ones a lot of people turn their attention to.

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  12. Ian Poulos

    This HBO series of the millennial “Girls” has selected one cross-section of today’ youth to portray in the program, but this is not necessarily representative of the whole population of millennials. In every generation there will be parents who coddle their children and others who help them grow into well-rounded adults that can enter a new situation and be able to step-up to the task at hand. The older generation who has had a certain amount of real-world-experience will, at times, feel confident and perhaps be somewhat condescending toward a young person just entering the workforce. On the other hand, a young person entering the working world might feel somewhat insecure about his or her ability to fit well into a new environment. Is this not also true in most situations outside of the millennial versus workforce relationship? New situations make some of us uncomfortable and insecure while others take the challenge with very few missteps.
    Steve Earl is correct when he writes “it is you that have to make career development happen,…” Once an opportunity is made available, it is you, regardless if you are a millennial or otherwise that has to prove you can handle it without “bitching” or having to call mom for help.
    A Forbes article recently written by Jenna Goudreau, “7 Surprising Ways to Motivate Millennials,” points out some very good ways to motive people, and although none of these are surprising one is perhaps more applicable to the millennials that to prior generations: offer more flexibility. Due to the use of multi-media and the tech-savvy nature of this generation perhaps more flexibility with work schedule and location of work place should be more of a concern now than before. However, the other motivators mentioned – explain company vision, give feedback, create steps and titles, prioritize community service, provide education, and give time for personal projects – have been and will continue to be important for all generations.

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  13. Hunter F. (@kristintellsall)

    The problem is there are stereotypes for a reason. One bad egg and everyone feels like they need to throw out the whole lot. However, I have never seen as many millennials work their asses off at any other school other than Hofstra especially for School of Comm. students. People live, eat, and breathe their internships just to get a good recommendation, put any sort of work on their resume, or just to gain experience and nothing else. I think the image is washing away. Seeing as we face so many challenges when we graduate it shows hard work when someone finally lands a job or finds their life path laying before them. Facing loans, unemployment, and debt I’d say we have no choice but to think a little quicker on our feet and be creative with what we have.

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  14. LucieSorel

    I completely agree with your point. I think as times are rapidly changing with technology and the media on the rise, the new, young employees are vital to a company’s success. The young employees fresh out of college have new ideas about the world and an innovative approach to PR. If senior positions in a company look down on these new employees or don’t give them the time of day, this could be extremely detrimental to the business’s success. Confidence is an important trait for a new employee. To have others believe in you, you must first wholeheartedly believe in yourself. Trust is a big issue when hiring young employees so if a recent graduate is well informed and confident in their knowledge, this will show through. Without fresh thinkers, a company will be stuck in the past and ultimately fall apart.

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  15. aciardullo

    I think this was a great post and very relevant to what most of us are dealing with right now. I have seen a handfull of episodes fo the show Girls. I think that it shows that things don’t come as easy as people (especially parents) make it out to be. Nothing is easy or comes easy in the real world/when you are actually on your own. It is important to learn and realize that you need to work hard in order to get what you want and to be successful (you might not even end up getting what you want.) Our generation is known for being sheltered and always being taken care of by our parents. At our age, older generations were already living on their own, supporting themselves and potentially even married with kids. Things have changed but they still need to realize that they have to give us a shot because that’s the only way we can prove ourselves.

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  16. aunaturalenyc

    Everyone needs to work as hard as they can to achieve their goals. Is that more or less for an generation? No. I think our generation has a lot to offer to the industry, that most folks currently in the industry don’t have the same skills to do. We definitely have a unique edge that could help us when job searching. However, I think the slacking occurs in every generation, it just depends on who the person is, not when they were born. At Hofstra alone, you will see the PR majors who just sit in class (when it’s not to hot) and do the minimal to get their diploma. However, there are also the ones who do all they can and strive to achieve the best while at school. You can never generalize anyone because of their age or what they are doing.

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  17. Marissa Dombkowski

    I really enjoyed this post. Being in the process of applying for jobs, I constantly wonder how I am going to break into the field and prove that though I am young, I am still a capable and talented PR professional. As far as the comments made my Scott Signore, I do not necessarily agree that our generation is “too self-absorbed” and “doesn’t think long term.” If anything, I know I have a lot to learn and I look forward to being able to listen and take away important information from my future co-workers who have been working in the field for a while. I also believe that I think long-term and I hope that the decisions I make today will be beneficial in the future. I know that job employment is extremely competitive these days, and I know that rejection is just going to be part of the process. I think that if us new PR professionals can accept the fact that this is normal, and that we won’t get every interview or job we are going for, but we stay driven and keep at it, then this is the right attitude to have.

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  18. kerrischreiberer

    People should not look at age to determine whether a person has worked hard or not. The younger generation is no different than any other generation and should be welcomed by the older generations. Especially with our knowledge of the Internet and social media, they should be learning from us and how online public relations can be a great tool.

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  19. EMC

    I appreciate your thoughts on this issue! As a millennial just starting out in the career world I tend to overanalyze my role and that of my peers, whether it be at my internships, in class, or through what I observe online. It’s true that these criticisms are true of every generation, and it’s important to remember that, always. One thing that is important for myself and my peers to remember is that the changing media has helped develop a less formal tone of the business world, but we can never forget that our superiors are wiser than us, and probably thought like us at some point. Their views of us are probably based on years of experience and memories of what they did “wrong” in their early years. Take everything with a grain of salt, but don’t disregard the opinion of the seasoned veterans of your field.

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  20. Claire T.

    I don’t think that the generation has much to do with this “milennial” attitude, I think it’s more so the age. I think in any generation there are going to be those kids who have been coddled since birth and those who have learned to work hard and challenge those above them. The ages 21-25 are the time in a person’s life when they are settling into their own and truly finding their own work ethic. I don’t think that concept is exclusive to any generation.

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  21. Nicole Chiarella

    I think every generation is different and there are many older PR people that like a young fresh mind around. I do not feel entitled to anything, I have worked hard my entire life and will continue into my adulthood and career. We all have our short-comings but it is up to us to grow and succeed. I never expected this to be easy, I prepared myself to be ready for the busy work field I will be working in for the rest of my life.

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  22. Brittni Hicks

    When I am going on interviews for internships, if my interviewer is older, I definitely get the sense that they do not feel I am competent just because of my generation. I do think that our generation will be forced to prove ourselves everyday, not just in PR, in any industry we choose to work really. But I think that when anyone gets a new job, from any generation, they will be expected to prove themselves..

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  23. Amanda Torres

    The younger generation is going to take over….. KIDDING! I agree. Talent and skills will prevail over everything else. Everyone should be working their hardest to not only maintain their skills, but also to improve them. As for our generation feeling “entitled”… I say we deserve to feel A LITTLE entitled to certain things. After all, who can work electronics better than we can? Who can use social networks better than us?

    BUT at the same time the older generations have their own entitlement. They are pros! I think what’s most important is for all of us to collaborate to ALL be the best.

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  24. Jenny Rowe

    I agree that no matter what generation you were born into, hard work, dedication and commitment are all things everyone needs to have to succeed. As time goes on it gets harder to get a job and the competition becomes more competitive. That being said, I think that the people who work the hardest and show the most dedication will succeed the most in the end.

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  25. gionnacerniglia

    No matter what generation you were born into, hard work, dedication and commitment are all things one needs to have. Every year, it gets harder to get a job and the competition becomes more and more competitive, especially for Public Relations professionals. The show, Girls, is one of my favorite shows, and I think it gives us a reality check on how “after college life” is going to be like. However, I believe that as long as you work hard and make everyday count, you will succeed.

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  26. ccorte6

    I believe that nothing is handed to you, you must work hard for everything. While I defintiely feel that some people of our generation aren’t as motivated as previous generations, there are a multitude who are. We learned it from our parents. But it is ignorant for people to think that younger generations bring nothing to the table. While previous generations may get the wrong idea about the way younger generations handle certain aspects of business, maybe they should consider that the old way of doing things is obsolete and should listen to their younger colleagues.

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  27. Steve Koenigsberg

    The More Things Change, The More They Stay the Same

    In the Sioux City (Iowa) Journal’s Sunday edition of June 3, 1956, the paper ran a letter from Rev. Glee E. Lockwood in its “Public Forum” column. The good reverend noted that he had read with “vital interest” Marjorie Howe’s report concerning the “screaming reception” for Elvis at the city’s auditorium. He then commended the paper for “getting to the general public and young people of Sioux City the most real side of the Elvis Presley program—the side that does not appear amid the commercially controlled theatrical and T.V. billings.”

    Lockwood congratulated Howe on her reporting, and added, “I am sure that she, along with all others who have even a small sense of ethical and moral values, deplores the coming to our great city of such men as Elvis Presley and his ilk—rightly referred to as the ‘male counterpart of a hoochee-koochee dancer in a burlesque show.’ God only knows how far down … our Sioux City young people were pushed down by Elvis Presley’s appearance here.” (The reverend’s comments of course imply that the 5,000 Sioux City citizens who witnessed Presley’s show lacked “even a small sense of ethical and moral values.”)

    The clergyman closed his letter with a righteous stand against the Presley scourge sweeping the land. “I am forever and eternally against such programs being laid at the feet of our Sioux City young people,” he declared, “and will do everything in my power to counteract such influences.”

    I mean, what is going on with this new young generation?

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  28. Stephen Koenigsberg

    The More Things Change, The More They Stay the Same

    In the Sioux City (Iowa) Journal’s Sunday edition of June 3, 1956, the paper ran a letter from Rev. Glee E. Lockwood in its “Public Forum” column. The good reverend noted that he had read with “vital interest” Marjorie Howe’s report concerning the “screaming reception” for Elvis at the city’s auditorium. He then commended the paper for “getting to the general public and young people of Sioux City the most real side of the Elvis Presley program—the side that does not appear amid the commercially controlled theatrical and T.V. billings.”

    Lockwood congratulated Howe on her reporting, and added, “I am sure that she, along with all others who have even a small sense of ethical and moral values, deplores the coming to our great city of such men as Elvis Presley and his ilk—rightly referred to as the ‘male counterpart of a hoochee-koochee dancer in a burlesque show.’ God only knows how far down … our Sioux City young people were pushed down by Elvis Presley’s appearance here.” (The reverend’s comments of course imply that the 5,000 Sioux City citizens who witnessed Presley’s show lacked “even a small sense of ethical and moral values.”)

    The clergyman closed his letter with a righteous stand against the Presley scourge sweeping the land. “I am forever and eternally against such programs being laid at the feet of our Sioux City young people,” he declared, “and will do everything in my power to counteract such influences.”

    I mean, what is going on with this new young generation?

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  29. Brenna Harran

    I believe everyone needs to work hard when in a position at company, especially to advance your career. Our generation has many expectations placed upon us but I believe being young and thinking highly of yourself in a career only makes you do better. Society is changing and the younger, fresher minds and opinions you have the better. I can’t see why someone would look at this as negative. I understand how older generations can feel frustration but working together can become a positive!

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  30. Lauren Ciuzio

    It’s really discouraging that employers today expect so much from my generation, and in turn, do not give us enough credit. Luckily, I was lucky to have had two internships that I loved, and I feel like I really did a great job within the both of them. However, that is not always the case. My generation is often looked down upon, and our elders often consider us lazy. While that may be the case for some, I am certainly not lazy. I think it has to do a lot with how you are raised. My parents always gave me everything I needed and more, but they also encouraged me to work hard, and to never give up. The “baby boomers” also have a hard time accepting social media, as I learned in my PR 107 class last semester, which really sets back their organizations from the competition.

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  31. Amanda Daley

    I am a fan of the show “Girls” and as a student who is preparing to graduate in May it really defines the way many students feel about diving into the real world. I think that millennials have a lot to offer older generations especially with the growth of social media and digital media within companies. I think that it is true that people my age are held to a different standard. Where I intern, my internship supervisor almost seemed surprised that I was able to power through tasks without him having to explain to me twice. I think that this examples is something that many people my age probably face. I think that it would be extremely beneficial for older generations to combine their brains and experience with a fresh and new look at the business which can come from the millennial age group.

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  32. aalvey

    I think it’s unfair that we have to bend over backwards every day to just seem worthy. I feel that the older members of management and the other “baby boomers” are afraid of change, and that’s not only evident here, but also in their hesitations towards social media. As said by Pumba in the Lion King, “You gotta put your behind in your past.” Time to move forward and accept that times are changing at an above average speed as well, and those who try to put the breaks on it, are going to feel the burn. We may be known as impulsive, entitled and self-absorbed, it’s because we have visions, we know how to get them and we’re not going to let anyone tell us no. You want robot maids in the next 20 years? Then move over! But I still appreciate everything management and the baby boomers have to offer, it’s all about balance. Just don’t rag on us. We do good work.

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  33. Andrea Rebello

    It frustrates me how older generations automatically place us into categories because of our age; this is ultimately the result of the social construction of age. I guess society’s generalization that we think we are “entitled” is somewhat true, but isn’t it better to be confident and think highly of yourself, as opposed to thinking lower of yourself and your capabilities? Confidence is key when it comes to the real world, especially when you are trying to stand out from your competition.

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  34. gmcillo

    This post brings up a great point! I feel that every generation goes through this and I don’t think it is only the generation of the millennial that come off as “entitled” or “self-absorbed.” I defiantly think it is worse in our generation then it was in pervious ones. But I feel that every generation went through this stage, and you do not realize it until you are looking and criticizing the younger generation that is ready to take over your job. It’s funny how the generation of baby-boomers is so quick to judge us but I bet if you talked to the generation before them, they would also feel that the baby-boomers came off as “entitled.”

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  35. stevenpmorin

    Obviously, I, and most people posting here, as millennials, have a pretty clear bias. That being said, there are some major flaws in the youth-bashing movement.

    1 – “Kids today feel entitled to success!” – This is not the fault of the millennials themselves. If this an issue at all, it is the fault of the parents and the generation before the millennials that fluffed up their mind with “if you go to college, you can be whatever you want when you grow up” and “if you wish upon a star, your dreams can come true.” Are the millennials seriously to blame for believing their parents and doing what their elders tell them? To me, this sounds more like the previous generation has let the world fall short of their expectations, and are upset with the youth for constantly reminding them what they failed to provide. I *love* hearing “don’t sit there bitching.” We have the right to bitch. We have done everything we were required to do; we have worked diligently for sixteen years and dug ourselves into a decade of debt to get a college education; don’t you dare tell us we’re “bitching” because there aren’t jobs available.

    2 – “Kids today have been coddled by their parents!” – Again, this is the fault of our parents, not us.

    3 – “Kids today have short attention spans!” – Twitter, Facebook, and the multitude of rapidly-changing TV shows have led us to be scatter-brained. However this is simply the way the world is changing. New is spread in 140-character bites and people use apps on their phones while watching TV – not just kids. If you haven’t noticed, there is a massive growing industry dedicated to this short attention span. If one refuses to change along with the world, they are welcome to cling to their beliefs until the world changes without them and leaves them in the dust.

    4 – “Kids today have poor critical thinking skills!” – This appears to me unwarranted and incorrect. Kids today are constantly connected to dozens of social media sites at all times. These sites are filled with the wide variety of people sharing their opinions, values, and beliefs. I am exposed to critical thinking exercises every day as my beliefs are constantly challenged, evaluated, and (possibly) changed. I learn more in one night via social networking sites on my down time than I do during a week of traditional schooling! Kids today are connected to the world reading and learning about news and culture at an exponentially-higher rate than generations previous.

    5 – “Kids today have poor writing skills!” – lol this is a misconception due to, maybe, a lack of critical thinking?? smh… language 2day isnt degrading, its changing!!! 4 the 1st time in history we can write like we speak quickly + efficiently. THAT is the goal of writing lol. 4 a better explanation, watch this TED talk video : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmvOgW6iV2s /rant

    I feel the generation previous is so hostile towards the millennials, blaming us and slandering us at every chance, because we have so many opportunities in front of us. With the connectivity of the world today and our eager minds always asking “why” and “how,” we have the power to change the world from the shackles of their suddenly out-dated thoughts. This hate isn’t a one-way street. The millennials see themselves as being held down by their previous generation; their growth is stunted by crooked politics and elders who refuse to change, clinging to the excuse of “tradition” and old books. The millennials are begging for a chance to change the world for the better, but to do that, we need to seize control from the older generation. When we succeed, they will begin the quick decent to irrelevancy. No wonder they hate us.

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  36. Leonora

    Loved this post, Professor! Scott Signore is actually the CEO of my agency — I started as an Account Coordinator here at Matter Communications just last month. I think his point about millennials bringing a new perspective to the workplace is 100% spot on. Some of the things that we grew up with and use for non-professional reasons (such as the value of 140 characters) are completely lost on the older generation! Thank you for sharing Scott’s insight. Hope all is well at Hofstra! -Lee F.

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  37. Shurida Lundi

    The older generation needs to step aside just a little bit and let us millennials shine. It is hard for us to stand out when everyone claims they are unique and creative and eager to learn new things. I know I have to prove myself when I get into the “real world”, something I am nervous but excited about. We may feel “entitled” to things but in reality, we’re only entitled to what we work for. I have respect for the baby boomer generation because they paved the way for me, but they have to let me figure out things on my own and help create new ideas for the future.

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  38. aspenc6

    It frustrates me that older generations think this about us millennials! Although I can see where they are coming from because the way that many parents raise children nowadays can sometimes result in self-importance. With that aside, there are definitely TONS of people in my generation that do not possess the qualities that you mentioned. Sometimes I think that this feeling of entitlement that many seem to think that my generation has comes from the always-changing career-driven world. College is no longer a choice but a requirement and finding jobs once you leave college is almost impossible. We carry around this attitude because we have to protect ourselves!

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  39. Christina D

    Although I don’t watch “Girls”, I think that entitlement is just a common quality among people our age. For some, it may never go away and is just part of their personality. But for many, it lessens as they fully experience the “real” world. Regardless, I think Signore brought up a good point in emphasizing how young people’s fresh and open-minded approaches are essential to success in the PR field. Entitled or not, today’s youth is making worthwhile contributions to the work world.

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  40. Mia D'Angelo

    I LOVE girls. The shows complexity and ground breaking style is contributed to its rightfully earned success. It is ironic that in the show, Lena Dunham (main character) plays that “feeling entitled” “unmotivated” character when in real life she could not be more opposite. I agree 100% that standing out is critical in order to land a job and be successful. In past generations, college was the “stand out” factor that put many people ahead of the game. Yet, in our generation, the role of college has shifted from a “stand out” factor, to a requirement. Therefore, we have to start getting creative and thinking even further outside of the box to attain success since a diploma holds less pull as it has in the past. This is not to say college is not valuable and important! I just feel that as generations go on, college is becoming more and more standardardized for post-graduation plans. I also believe that every generation has that group of unmotivated, privileged people who expect success to come knocking on their door and that group who finds success and knocks on ITS door. Society becomes more and more advanced as years go on and therefore, the people must as well!

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  41. alexis gionesi

    I find it kind of funny that I was having a similar conversation (more of an argument) with my mom this morning of how our generations differ. She went on to saying that my generation feels too entitled. She may be right, but who made us act this way?

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  42. Sarah Caruso

    I think everyone thinks they’re entitled, not just millennials. We are all being coddled by our parents, our teachers, our government. Everyone will pat you on the head and tell you you’re smart and unique but the truth is most of us are mediocre. There is a small percentage of really intelligent people and they are the one’s who go out there and change the world. The rest of us are wasting space and living unfulfilled lives because we’ve always been told how great we are and then we get out into the real world and see that we aren’t as special as everyone said.

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  43. nikkigyftopoulos

    I agree with the fact that our generation can be seen as “self-absorbed” and “entitled”, but I believe that there are people like that in every generation. However, the ones who will be successful in the PR industry and make it to the top are the people who show that they are different from the stereotype and strive to have an edge in a competitive work industry. The closer I get to graduating college and entering the real world, the more I realize that I must do everything in my power to be different. There are really no tricks or spells to being successful. Success lies in your own hands and the people who achieve it are the ones who work hard and go above and beyond the rest.

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  44. Kellianne

    I have to say, this is probably one of my favorite posts! I believe that the older generations should welcome the younger generations entering the field, considering after the older generations retire, the younger generations will follow in their footsteps. The older generations should take these as opportunities to teach the younger generations the tools of the trade. I think that both groups of people can teach each other! Older generations can learn things such as how to use social media to a company’s advantage.

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  45. janabanana12

    I agree that everyone needs to work hard, our generation especially. Unfortunately, we came to the wrong place at the wrong time, but I also think it gives us that unique edge. Being “entitled” and driven helps us push farther and (hopefully) get to where we want to be. I personally love the show “Girls” and I think it defines the confusion we experience when we leave college and are forced to jump into the “real world,” whatever that may be.

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