Pecha Kucha: "wRiting tight"

pecha-kuchaPecha Kucha is a term I learned a couple of years ago while attending the New York State Communication Association (NYSCA) conference in upstate New York.  I was so intrigued by this Japanese short form of presenting that I challenged myself to create a Pecha Kucha for last year’s conference.

Simply defined, Pecha Kucha is the “art of concise presentations,” in which the author tells a story in 20 slides, shown for 20 seconds each.  The presenter can provide narration for each slide as it appears, but must keep the description to 20 seconds or be out of sync with the slides, which are timed to change automatically.

This is truly difficult to do.  My NYSCA colleagues sometimes struggle to keep the timing right.  They are the same people who have to “write tight” and teach “tight” writing.  And don’t we all write—and read—in brief bursts of information and words?  We gravitate to short stories, bulleted headlines, Facebook posts and Twitter messages limiting us to 140 characters.  All are exercises in saying as much as you can using few words as possible.

We also love “tight” photo expression.  Visual imagery with short captions have propelled Instagram, Pinterest and other platforms.  The need for speed and quickly-read access to information has changed the way we learn about our world—and has, subsequently, also changed the public relations profession dramatically.

Most of these written expressions are free-form and less structured than a Pecha Kucha presentation.  While space might limit the number of words and characters we use in our current platforms, we usually have time to think about what we want to write (although many of us don’t—we just write and post.)  It’s one thing to be able to present an idea or a story using a picture and just a few words, but it becomes far more challenging when you have three parameters to work within: words, pictures and time.

If we’re all learning as PR practitioners to “write tighter,” I wonder how many of us would be willing to challenge ourselves to create Pecha Kucha presentation.  Your thoughts?

65 thoughts on “Pecha Kucha: "wRiting tight"

  1. lmansl1

    I don’t know if I’d be able to do it! I tend to write lengthy prose and include too many details. One of my biggest challenges throughout my college career is cutting down and making my writing more concise. I do think it’s an interesting concept and I would be willing to try. I’m always up for a challenge!

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  2. jeremydbeck

    I think this is a very interesting idea that is highly practical. Most people, due to the consumption of social media, only have a limited concentration time. This platform can help people get engaged and stay interested, as opposed to powerpoint which always seems to have unlimited and lengthy slides.

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  3. kerry stewart

    There seems like theres a million different things being offered to us that create shortcuts and make things easier. Although these new things are exciting to try and learn and will eventually become the sole way of the world, I can’t help but wonder if we’re depriving ourselves of learning skills that although simple and maybe useless, can still be good to have. I can’t help but think about the computer in general, they keep getting smaller and easier for us to use and we’re almost to the point in a matter of a few short years of completely relying on them. I just feel as though we’re relying greatly on the shortcuts that can induce our laziness.

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  4. Jeremy Epstein

    I have mixed feelings about Pecha Kucha. I think it is good because you need to be able to give out a large amount of information in a quick amount of time. Plus most people’s attention spans do not last more than the amount of time Pecha Kucha allots. Yet I think we should try to change that. In this instant gratification age everyone wants to know everything immediately but sometimes it is better to take it slow and fully explain the concepts. While that may be boring it works.

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  5. Alexandra Ciongoli

    I don’t like the idea of Pecha Kucha presentations. If we as a human race keep focusing on the idea of tighter, terser and simpler writing, will writing eventually disappear altogether? I do not think long, flowery language is needed all the time, but more eloquent writing is definitely an art form that should not be overlooked or cut from our lives. I also never understood the point of timed things; timed writings, times sections of the SAT’s, and now the 20-second-a-slide Pecha Kucha presentation method all put pressure on humans to be better, faster and more efficient. Such expectations cause performance anxiety because they are unnecessarily nerve wracking. Not to mention how unrealistic it is to assume that everyone can read, learn, and perform at the same rate as this article mentions. I don’t think anyone should have to conform his or her lives to the Pecha Kucha method, because it takes away the opportunity for individuality, self-expression and normalcy.

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  6. rachaeldurant

    During my senior year of high school, one of my math teachers challenged us to create a Pecha Kucha about a STEM career that interested us. It was definitely a difficult task, but it helped to hone the message that was being addressed. While not always appropriate for a PR situation, preparing such a presentation could help get to the root of the message. In a society that is wary of public relations professionals “spinning” a message, a short presentation could help the presenter gain credibility with the public s they are limited in what they can express. As mentioned in the post, our society has gravitated to quick bursts of information through social media. While this trend makes it easy to consume mass amounts of information, it is sad that the days of thought-out and longer forms of media are coming to a close. There is something wonderful about reading a long, well-written piece.

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  7. jessicaxxrebello

    “Pecha Kucha” seems like a very interesting and creative way of presenting information. If a professor used this style of presenting in one of my classes I feel that I would personally be very intrigued by the presentation and I would be very easy to understand and process the information as well as the rest of the class. The reason I say this is because like you said, because of all the new social media outlets now available, people especially those who are my age, are now very used to seeing, reading, and understanding shorter messages. I think it would be difficult, yet fun to challenge myself to create a Pecha Kucha presentation.

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  8. acasole

    Pecha Kucha sounds both interesting and challenging. I think it is an extremely inventive and positive change to the future of presentation tools and is transforming into something that this current digital day and age can relate to and connect with. As your blog post stated, my generation is very familiar with condensing our thoughts into character limits and is also used to skimming through information at a quick and efficient pace as our brains sift through the information to find what is most important to us. 20 slides and 20 seconds sounds like a challenging task to create, but in the end I feel that it would be extremely effective to the selected audience. Sometimes too much information is in fact ineffective and this tool gives the opportunity to condense ones thoughts into an efficient amount of presentation time. Pecha Kucha sounds likes like a great skill to have knowledge in for the future and is certainly something that I would be willing to try.

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  9. Emily Green

    Pecha Kucha would be a challenging, yet beneficial thing to do with the current times we are in. People are most interested in the shortest stories because it takes less time out of their day. Pecha Kucha makes it mandatory that presentations are short and to the point. More people will be likely to keep their focus on the topic, and the presenter is more likely to keep the details to what is necessary rather than ramble on about unnecessary facts that the audience might get bored with.

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  10. Lindsey

    In this information driven age, people are interested in getting as much information as possible, as quickly as possible, and as easily as possible. No one has time- or thinks they have time- to read long articles with paragraph descriptions. People want concise facts and telling pictures. We all must learn to be brief as writers if we want the attention of our readers to last longer than 30 seconds. Short, tight sentences are a good way to give energy and urgency to your writing without leaving out any details or censuring yourself.

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  11. Francesca Bove

    Pecha Kucha, like everything has a good an bad side to it. On the positive side, it teaches professionals to keep presentations and thoughts short, straight up, and to the point. This allows for no fluff or unnecessary information to be added which can detract from the main point. On the negative side, although like it was mentioned that people “write tight” on a daily basis with social media, it does in fact limit or affect our speech and how we portray our thoughts. I know when I only have 140 characters to work with on twitter I find myself trying to get around every grammatical rule I can in order to make my thought fit the space. Overall I think that society is going to continue to have to learn to write tighter and tighter therefore learning how to use techniques such as Pecha Kucha could be very beneficial.

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  12. Dilpreet Kainth

    The way we write at times is very unconventional because we learn to right “tight” and in “140 characters” which can ultimately limit our speech and everyday conversation. That is the negative side, however, the positive side is that there is no fluff and nonsense, the facts and statements are straight to the point and easy to understand. You can say what you want simply and short and allow your audience to understand the first time. Pecha Kucha sounds great! Although it may not be too detailed and descriptive, it gets the message across and is straight to the point. We have learned with instant messaging, texting and social media to be quick and to the point. And we can use this to our professional careers.

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  13. janecapants

    I think that Pecha Kucha is a wonderful, yet challenging idea. It would take much practice to master a presentation, but completely worth it. I know that if I listen to someone speak about the same thing for a long period of time I become bored. Pecha Kucha is right to the point and will keep the audiences’ attention. If this style of writing and presenting information is taught, writing less and getting straight to the point, I think it would be very beneficial especially in the communications and public relations field.

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  14. Robert Ryan

    A Pecha Kucha presentation sounds like a challenge I would like to undertake. However, it would definitely be something that would have to be practiced over and over again until it is mastered. A lot of presentations I have done in not only college but also in high school I have walked in to class and just sort of went for it. I think this is the foundation you need to be capable of performing a Pecha Kucha presentation. The confidence in yourself to perform a good presentation is what you need to decide to do a Pecha Kucha presentation. Combine confidence and work ethic and I don’t see why I wouldn’t be able to perform a Pecha Kucha.

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  15. Jordan Richmond

    I think this is an awesome idea! I know I’m much more of a flowery writer, and would not do so well if I were in this situation. However, it’s an interesting way to keep people’s writing concise. We’re continuously reminded that people don’t want to be showered with words, they want to get to the point and that’s it. Because our society is much more rushed than others, we don’t want to devote the time to sift through wordy emails and presentations, when we could get the same message with less effort. While this presentation’s guidelines are difficult to meet, I think it’s a fascinating way to remind us how precious our time is when delivering information.

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  16. Olga

    I would love to learn to write presentations in the Pecha Kucha style. It is always challenging to express yourself in the informative and, at the same time, concise way. Indeed, brevity is the sister of talent.

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  17. Emily J DiLaura

    It’s funny, I didn’t know there was a name for this, but they actually used this in RA training this year at one of our presentations. It was a lot more effective considering I can still recall most of the slide from the specific session. I think the idea of Pecha Kucha will become more and more popular as times goes on. As you mentioned, society is changing to shorter texts when reading. Twitter is a prime example that you mentioned. Before writing was invented, the only way to get information out was by memorization. People had much longer attention spans then, but now, attention spans are getting shorter and shorter. This is going to make this presentation style A LOT more common in today’s world and in the future. Guess I better start practicing!

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  18. Ishan Kumar

    It is certainly a new fun way of giving presentations but challenging as well. As our attention span getting smaller Pecha Kucha is paving the way for modern presentations. Although I have never tried but certainly believe that intensive rehearsals would be necessary before using Pecha Kucha style of presentation. Furthermore it will be intrusting to know whether Pecha Kucha is useful in business presentations.

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  19. Kalli Dionysiou

    I have to create a Pecha Kucha presentation for one of my graduate classes. As nervous as I am to see how it actually comes out, I’m excited to learn a different form of presentation!

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  20. Laurel Smith

    We live in a world today where time is essential. Every minute, nay, every second counts. When we add up the wasted amount of seconds we thoughtlessly dwindle away in a day, it is amazing to see the hours upon hours spent on Facebook or washing our hands or sleeping that could have been spent on more productive uses.
    Therefore, I understand the draw that Pecha Kucha has. Saving time, holding people’s attention, and being more efficient and effective. The challenge I see with Pecha Kucha is not the idea of it, which I believe is a very good one, but the potential for Pecha Kucha to go so terribly wrong. Imagine if you are presenting in front of your company’s board, and though hours of hours of time has been spent practicing, you somehow get nervous and mess up. These messes could fatal. Much easier would be to simply present in a less nerve racking way. Or at least that is how I see it.

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  21. nicole_lombardo

    The idea of giving a Pecha Kucha presentation seems extremely difficult and maybe a little nerve racking but I feel that a successful presentation would become essential. In today’s society people enjoy having everything at a fast pace and quick information, its all about right here and now; the use of the word wait is a death sentence. I feel that a Pecha Kucha would be incredible for today’s society. If all information can be given in 20 second slides, 20 slides, 400 seconds altogether, 6 and a half minutes, why not take that opportunity? If people can understand, and accept the all the information in 6 minutes It should be a tool that is taught and learned by many.

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  22. Julia Ryan

    I believe that “tight writing” is what makes the writing in public relations both effective and frustrating. It is truly difficult for some people (myself included) to narrow down what they want to say to one page, or 140 characters– whatever the limits are. We are taught since we were young to begin essays with flowery statements and creative phrases, yet once we enter the field of public relations/journalism we completely flip this idea on its head. I know for me, in the beginning, this was the hardest part about the field. I can imagine that creating and executing a Pecha Kucha presentation would be even harder, because as you explained, you are working with 3 different parameters. I would enjoy trying this one day, as I feel like (if executed correctly) this could be a very effective method for presentation.

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  23. Max Eisenberg

    While I personally do not like restrictions of any kind in any aspect of life, I can see how Pecha Kucha would be useful in the PR world. It’s essential now to be short and concise, as most people’s attention spans are incredibly short. If you are too wordy or take too much time to get a thought across, people tune you out no matter how important the information you’re saying is. Pecha Kucha sounds like a difficult thing to do but perhaps it will become a regular practice and we’ll all learn it in college.

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  24. Jaime Silano

    This is the first time I have heard of Pecha Kucha. My initial question was how such an abrupt and fast-paced presentation actually resonate in the minds of people who are seeing a presentation for the first time. However, as I kept reading and made a connection to twitter and other networks we use to communicate that give us restrictions, I started to think of how beneficial it is to a presentation to prevent “fluff.” So much of what we read is seasoned with redundancy and meaninglessness. It is sometimes refreshing to be presented with JUST the facts. I think Pecha Kucha sounds like a comprehensive and interesting way to present information.

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  25. Adria Marlowe

    Although imposing a 20 second limit on each slide might seem quite restrictive at first, I think that attempting a Pecha Kucha presentation would be a very positive experience. I recently attended a “Presenting Data and Information” course by Edward Tufte, who spoke critically about the way PowerPoint has traditionally been used as more of a guide to reassure the presenter than as a tool to engage the audience. It seems as though Pecha Kucha’s concise format with an emphasis on presenting stimulating visual elements, is a much more effective method for engaging audiences than the traditional PowerPoint presentations I’ve both presented and sat though. I would be interested in giving this format a try.

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  26. Molly Eyassu

    I think in today’s society, being about to master Pecha Kucha would be a remarkable skill. People have small intention spans and this may be the way to reach people in a memorable way to reach people. I would love to try this.

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  27. Kim Gray

    This is the first time I’m hearing about Pecha Kucha and I find it rather interesting and challenging. You are right in terms of how we use Instagram and Pinstrest so we are usually subjected to 140 characters anyway. However, this is a skill that I think should be enforced as a PR practitioner because as you already mention in class time and time again write more using fewer words. With the time and speed of Pecha Kucha, it would be easier to communicate key messages, which will keep the audience intrigued and attentive.

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  28. stacy05

    Pecha Kucha sounds very interesting. However, seems very challenging to do as it involves lots of critical thinking. Nevertheless, I believe it could be beneficial to grab an audience attention and quickly get a point across. I personally, would love to try it as I struggle to get to the point of my arguments without getting off topic. I believe that it could help me challenge myself by staying in the parameters of words, pictures, time. Could also even help me in other things that I do as well as my everyday life.

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  29. Brenna O'Shea

    Pecha Kucha definitely sounds like a challenge, even for someone who has mastered public speaking. It seems to be a a whole new level of public speaking with strict guidelines that consist of 20 seconds per slide. As most would agree, it is hard enough to get your presentation to be the time it is suppose to be (say 10 minutes), but only being able to speak for 20 seconds on each slide is even more challenging. Once you do it, I am sure it is very rewarding and a great learning experience. I would like to watch someone do a Pecha Kucha presentation before I were to even think about taking one on myself.

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  30. Chelsey Fuller

    Even though it may be a complicated presentation, I think every person should try and do one Pecha Kucha in their life. It would definitely teach us important skills that would come in handy once in the professional world, and it also helps to work under pressure. No person likes having a specific time limit but in the end, it really does benefit you in a way. Personally, I wouldn’t want to always do a Pecha Kucha presentation but I think using it occasionally would remind us of “tight writing” and how important it really is in the pr profession.

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  31. Nick Stiles

    I think Pecha Kucha is a very difficult thing for anyone to do effectively. Although social media may limit the amount we can say our entire academic careers we have been forced to write more. I’m sure most people have written a paper in which they repeat themselves just to reach the minimum page limit. Being concise in writing is a very difficult skill but can make understanding a topic much easier.

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  32. Max N.

    There is a very fine line between short & sweet and rough & abrupt. Pecha Kucha sounds like a very interesting style of presentation which forces you to walk this line. It makes your presentation into a kind of multi-media haiku in that it has very well defined parameters but allows the content and message to vary wildly. It really gives the presentation a structure and pushes it towards resembling a more traditional art form.

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  33. Whitney Shepherd

    I believe a Pecha Kucha presentation would be very challenging but at the same time very rewarding. A lot of the time being in the PR business requires a professional to reach out to the public and get their message out in a positive way. As stated in the article people today like the brief burst of information like the limited Facebook posts and tweets on Twitter. Being able to appeal to the public visually and with great words while only have 20 seconds is a very hard skill to master, but I definitely agree that it is worth it to try.

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  34. Ariana Goldklang

    I believe Pecha Kucha would be difficult to do, but also very rewarding. It’s very important to write concisely and we all need to learn how to do it. It’s a skill that really needs to be developed, I know for me especially. I believe that it is something we should try to do in order to learn.

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  35. Richard Rocha

    Personally, I often have teachers tell me I have to be more concise. It is usually the difference between an A and an A+ for me. My teacher or professor always says I was “right there”, but I need to write tighter. When I go back to edit my papers, I find myself struggling to cut back words and concepts. Pecha Kucha sounds like the opposite of my style. I feel as though if I challenged myself to present in such a concise way, I could possibly condition myself for tighter writing. Maybe it could be used as a teaching method?

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  36. Sharlys Leszczuk

    As soon as I started reading this article I was intrigued to try to present with these Petra Kucha guidelines. I think this is a crucial skill that people need whether they are in communications or not. It is exemplary how many presentations end up on terrible tangents that elongate the presentation so much. This style of presenting would force the presenter to prepare, it looks extremely professional, and it makes the presenter stick to the point they intend to make instead of ranting on forever and losing the audience’s focus.

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  37. Nancy Haas

    All writers,especially good writers should perfect the art of being concise. Many people make the mistake of using wordiness to expand on an idea. This takes away from what the writer is really trying to convey. It is best to be straight forward, to the point, and eliminate any unnecessary phrasing or words that just fill up a page. Pecha Kucha should be used as a tool to help writers, PR professionals, and people in general learn how to get their ideas across using as few words as possible. Today, most people have short attention spans due to constant visual stimulation, and the use of technology. Thus, PR professionals should know how to adapt their writing to reach a modern audience.

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  38. Laura Schioppi

    Pecha Kucha seems very hard to accomplish. However, it can also be used as a teaching tool for some people. Individuals who give a presentation don’t have to ramble on, but be concise and straight to the point. This can be an effective tool to teach students and even teachers to point out the main idea in a lesson or story. It seems like a difficult challenge to show a picture while explaining the story behind it. However, we do it everyday when we are on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc. A picture is worth a thousand words…so we only need 20 seconds to explain the main idea of it.

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  39. LaChele Prophet

    This term Pecha Kucha will be added to my favorite words to say like Machu Picchu. This new style of presentation seems like an effective professional tool that I don’t think I could master at the moment but it could be a fun challenge to take on. As a new PR student I’m having enough trouble learning all these new writing styles and terms. “Writing tight” is definitely something that I will have to grasp but as soon as I do, Pecha Kucha and any other thing that can be thrown at me will be learned. But I’m also very slow, I mean I just learned power point. DON’T JUDGE, VERY SAD I know, but I never had to use until now and I did get the hang of it.

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  40. Danie Zolezzi

    I have enough trouble getting everything I need to say into a tweet after thinking about it for a few minutes. I can only imagine how difficult it must be to give a whole presentation in just under seven minutes (20×20/60). Pecha Kucha would be a challenge for me but I would be willing to try it. However, I don’t know if “writing tighter” is necessarily a good thing. It forces people to use shortcuts and forgo proper grammar and punctuation even more than they already do.

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  41. adrianazappolo

    Pecha Kucha sounds like an effective, yet very challenging form of communication. As students we are used to writing long, detailed essays. In high school, the dreaded term paper kept students complaining for weeks. Yet, I find it interesting that it is sometimes much more difficult to write a short, straight to the point piece of writing rather than a long, in-depth piece. Eliminating extra words and thoughts isn’t as simple as it sounds. People want to receive a quick, easy to understand message. That is why short, concise writing is a crucial public relations skill.

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  42. cmadsenpr

    Creating a Pecha Kucha presentation sounds very challenging! Although it’s true that we do gravitate to shorter bits of information like Facebook and Twitter posts, Sparknotes, and short articles, I personally feel like when you are creating a presentation they tend to be longer. Especially as PR professionals, we learn to write as concisely as possible, so this form of presentation would be a great tool to learn how to use. It would have to be very accurate and engaging, but I think audiences would really appreciate the shorter presentation and simply getting the needed information as quickly and concisely as possible.

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  43. Maria Pascarella

    Pecha Kucha sounds extremely interesting, but I do think it could have some flaws. Our society really does operate in a concise way, but giving a lot of info in 20 seconds leaves a lot of room for misinterpretation or missing information. I think it would be fun to try a lecture in this format though!

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  44. csawye2

    Before reading this post I had never heard of “Pecha Kucha” and the specific art of the presentation. The element of time really can be a challenge as one must time themselves perfectly in order to be under the 20 seconds per slide. In this day and age everyone wants stuff immediately and quick so it could become extremely popular for that reason. It would certainly be a challenge to complete a slide in 20 seconds or less but it could be a fun challenge to try in class!

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  45. Cody Dano

    Before now, I had never heard of the phrase Pecha Kucha. However, after reading this article it seems to be a very smart and logical way of operating. Professor Morosoff was right when he said that we communicate through short bursts of information. Now the question is, if we are so used to speaking in short bursts, why is Pecha Kucha so difficult to do? It may seem like a simple question to answer, but is it actually? Mastering Pecha Kucha would be helpful in so many ways. People today, have neither the time, nor the patience to listen to a long lecture. We want short and precise information. Therefore, if you can get them everything they need to know in under 20 seconds, your presentation will be twice as powerful.

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  46. Yeliz A

    Pecha Kucha is not only fun to say, but is also a very interesting form of presentation. The challenge is to present an entire story in 20 seconds. I have such a hard time telling my own personal stories in 20 seconds! I’m sort of torn with whether or not I like this idea. You make a great point, the more and more social media advances the quicker people want their information, and they want it direct and to the point. I think this loses the specialty and the art of story-telling. A collection of photographs, a detailed narrative, and long form videos are, in my opinion, more moving and impactful. I think that in the professional field, including journalism and public relations, it does make sense to go in the short-form and straightforward direction; however when it comes to our social interaction I think that by losing the details we lose a part of what makes us unique. How do you personally relate to something if things are just simple and direct?

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  47. Sarah ElSayed

    I enjoy the idea of Pecha Kucha communications. The one possible flaw that I see in this type of communication, is that the audience could make their own inferences and assumptions about certain things presented. Although putting many ideas in few words is time efficient and seems very productive, I have my suspicions. I am going into PR to be a writer and a presenter of creative and innovative ideas – it can be hard to fully express yourself on behalf of a company or person in a few words.

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  48. Rob Moran

    This is very interesting to me. I would love to try it but I might fail miserably. One verbal fumble can throw off the whole thing which is pretty intimidating. I can understanding how this can be effective and newly popular though. People love speed news these days. My self included.

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  49. Isabela Jacobsen

    I would feel very nervous if I had to do a presentation like that! The timing is so precise that I would feel incredibly anxious to get it right. At the same time, I’m pretty curious to know if I could actually pull it off. The relationship between Pecha Kucha and public relations is very interesting. As students, our whole academic lives have been spent on writing long essays. In PR, however, less is more. It’s a skill that doesn’t come as easy as it sounds. Learning how to write for PR teaches us how important it is to choose our words carefully and the same goes to Pecha Kucha. Pecha Kucha challenges a person’s presentation and story telling abilities. Sounds like a great way to practice some public relation skills!

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  50. Marilyn Oliver

    The Pecha Kucha concept reminds me of an Albert Einstein’s quote, “If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.” What a great tool to get a message across. It’s been proven that people remember more when the message is in a concise format. While this format definitely poses a challenge, Pecha Kucha has the potential to increase the effectiveness of a message.

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  51. Lauren Platt

    Pecha Kucha sounds both interesting and challenging! I don’t know if I would personally be able to complete a presentation quite like this but it could be fun to try! My biggest issue is how much I love to speak! Once I am on a roll, there is no stopping me so it might be hard to condense everything I want to say into such a short amount of time.

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  52. Will Martinez

    Wow, 20 seconds per slide seems so short! I can see the benefit of tightening up presentations as so much of communication these days is condensed writing. Additionally, Pecha Kucha reiterates an important PR tip: time is money. In today’s Public Relations industry, with social media’s constant connectivity between journalists and PR practitioners, it is necessary to stay connected to your client’s media interests.

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  53. Brittany Witter

    Working on becoming the best PR professional I can be, I make sure to try and work on my public speaking as much as a can. However, I personally think the trying to successfully execute a Pecha Kucha would be quite hard for me. When I present I like to be concise, but timed slides would make me uncomfortable to say the least! I would love to see someone live complete this task though, I think that would be an inspiring moment to witness for me personally.

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  54. Alexandra Cohen

    Pecha Kucha is definitely a one of a kind term and can seem difficult to do. It’s definitely a very important skill set and will keep the audience focused on what is being said. I think more people should take this challenge. It makes the presenter think long and hard about what they want to say, must be specific and to the point. It will also get rid of extra words and make sure the presenter doesn’t get off topic or go on a tangent. Pecha Kucha is seen and used in social media and people don’t even realize that they’re “writing tight” every day. I think in the near future, especially in the professional world, Pecha Kucha will be used more often.

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  55. twade1031

    I think that the Pecha Kucha style of presenting is a fantastic idea which I hope is adopted by schools in the United States. In a world where the public’s attention spans are getting shorter and shorter, it is necessary for presenters, advertisers, and the like, to figure out how to communicate their points quickly and concisely because they won’t keep the people’s attention for too long. The Pecha Kucha presentation would be a useful tool in teaching people how to keep up with the times – to communicate with eachother using the fewest words possible.

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  56. akrame27

    Throughout my writing career, I feel as though I have spent far too much time adding a bunch of gibberish to my most of my papers, why? Well, that is because teachers are giving a min. amount of words or pages that a particular paper must be. Instead of writing and getting to my point, I find my self going on and on about the same thing just so I can fill up the page. The idea of Pecha Kucha is a great concept and really gets out what is the necessary information that needs to be presented. Sometimes less means more and with today’s world condensing the sentence to 140 characters or less, Pecha Kucha would be a great addition into the professional world.

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  57. madalyntundis

    Writing “tight” is something that I find myself struggling with from time to time. I love to write, speak, and express myself, and if I feel strongly enough, I could go on for pages (or hours!).
    Also, I think throughout grade school we are given assignments of 500 words or more (and usually much, much more) in order to provide teachers with a written piece of evidence that we have the ability to construct, describe, and elaborate on one specific topic or idea. We are trained to write 8-12 page papers and we have to come up with enough to say to fill all of those pages.
    Then we begin writing like PR professionals, where the majority of the copy we produce should be “tight”. How many times have you heard or said “clear and concise” in your PR classes? Our shift has changed, and we challenge ourselves to keep it short and sweet.
    Embracing a challenge like Pecha Kucha could prove to be very valuable in a profession like ours. Training yourself and really focusing on your writing skills, creating messages and producing content that can be summed up in 20 words or less – but never losing the ability to elaborate for 20 pages or more, if need be.

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  58. Rachel Tyler

    Pecha Kucha sounds interesting and challenging at the same time. 20 seconds is not a lot of time to get a point across for one slide. I feel like making the slides 20 seconds would be the challenging part but the presentation would be very beneficial to our this generation. This generation is used to things being short and concise because of social media so I feel that if they were to sit in on a Pecha Kucha presentation they would get more out of it because it would have to be more to the point.

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  59. Nathalie Salazar

    I totally agree that we live in a world that is “Pecha Kucha-esque.” All social media follows this communications model of short, concise messaging and I believe that makes modern day communication quite efficient and effective. Although we might be missing some details, the Pecha Kucha style of communication does leave us with the main important points of the message.

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  60. Brie S

    I had never heard of Pecha Kucha but it sounds like it would be a fun challenge to take on. Our PSA’s are only 30 seconds and it was hard to cram all our information into it without sounding rushed so 20 second slides would be ever harder. It might be doable in the US but it is hard to say. We do like information to come to us in a short time with more pictures and fewer words so it is possible but not a given.

    Being able to master Pecha Kucha would be an excellent skill to have though and something I would definitely be interesting in trying.

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  61. Joe Flanagan

    I would be willing to try the Pecha Kucha, but what I see to be a major issue is the preparation. It seems that the time it would take to prepare the Pecha Kucha would be far longer than any other style of presentation. If the time it takes to prepare a Pecha Kucha is that much longer, then doesn’t being concise defeat the purpose? That is a question that can only be answered through trying to create one.
    Although I see the time as a major issue, I would still be willing to try the style. With practice I think that it would come easier and end up being more effective in communicating an objective to influence public opinion.

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  62. croyal13

    I think that the Pecha Kucha serves as a beneficial tool for all aspiring professionals in the communications field. Since so many technology is available, people tend to become more distracted. Their attention span may not last as long as it once did. Therefore, journalists and PR professionals must learn how to write tightly and let the pictures do the talking for them. Many people struggle with getting to the point of their argument or the lesson. They must take advantage of the brief period of time they have of their audience’s attention. It will help PR professionals and journalists get the point across effectively and efficiently.

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  63. Lyndi Catania

    Pecha Kucha is a very interesting term. It sounds like a very challenging presentation and I feel as though although some people may be able to pull it off, others (especially new tight writers) might need a decent amount of preparation time before actually being able to present. I think it would be very beneficial if more people started to think more on the lines of Pecha Kucha when starting to write their piece. In the world today many people read to get the point of the story and if that doesn’t come quickly enough the audience may be turned off. Especially on Twitter, one has to be very smart with the words they choose due to the limit.

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  64. Zoe Hoffmann

    I think something like Pecha Kucha would never have existed years ago. In today’s society we are so used to reading and understanding things in such limited context. With all of the technology available to us, we as a society have changed the way we focus on things and our attention spans have gotten shorter and shorter. I thin Pecha Kucha is really interesting because in theory it should hold the audiences attention with the timeliness and speed at which the information changes. Because we process information so much differently now, I would be interested to see how older generations react to a Pecha Kucha presentation. I think newer generations could learn a lot from limiting content precisely. Words become more meaningful.

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  65. Leia Schultz

    Pecha Kucha sounds very interesting! And a challenge: only 20 seconds in as many slides to entirely and succinctly tell a story? That sounds like a skill set that needs to be developed and continually practiced to do well. It also seems like the audience would have to be really focused in order to fully appreciate and understand the Pecha Kucha. I’m not sure that this a trend that will take hold in the U.S., but as our community becomes more globalized perhaps we will see a rise in this style of presentation.

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