The People's Republic and PR

      64 Comments on The People's Republic and PR

I spent a few hours in China last week.

Well, I wasn’t actually in China. I spoke to several Chinese students through the “magic” of Skype. The purpose of my six conversations was to interview applicants to Hofstra’s graduate program in public relations. Interviews are standard practice for applicants, and it’s especially interesting when I can talk face-to-face to a potential student 7,000 miles away.

Each student was asked why they were interested in coming to the United States for an advanced degree, and each gave me similar reasons. Their primary goal was to obtain an education where they can use the communication theories they’ve learned as undergraduates in China for more practical, real-world applications. They want to accomplish this by coming to New York, where they know they’ll have excellent opportunities to intern, network and be exposed to some of the best and most experienced PR professionals in the world.

Another common thread in these conversations was their interest in learning in an American classroom. They’re used to lecture-style lessons in big classes where they don’t interact with the instructor or each other; their role is to listen, take notes and do little questioning. They all told me they’re looking forward to a classroom environment where they can have actual discussions with their professors and fellow students.

statue-liberty-over-flagOne student’s thoughts about America were especially intriguing. Her perceptions came from first-hand experiences while she was an exchange student at California’s Berkeley University. She was impressed with the openness and helpfulness of Americans, and how willing we are to extend a hand to a stranger who simply asks. Behind her on the wall was a huge picture of the Statue of Liberty and Old Glory.

It’s not easy for an international student to be successful in an American PR program. I make sure they understand the language challenges they face given the writing-intensive nature of our profession. I emphasize how the culture of our PR and media will greatly differ from theirs. If they qualify, we, too, will extend our hand. Your thoughts?

 

64 thoughts on “The People's Republic and PR

  1. alexandra

    I think one of the best things about Hofstra is their small-sized classroom lectures and discussions. Prior to transferring here, I attended UMASS Amherst, and at times it would be difficult to learn in a 200 person lecture, at least for me. Not only is it more engaging, easier to learn and ask questions, but you also form a bond with your professor, which I believe is important. For foreign students, learning in smaller class environments is especially beneficial, especially because it is not their native tongue. This way, they can work closer with students and the teachers, and engage more often than they would in a lecture.

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  2. stacy05

    What I love the most about most of my PR classes is the exchange of ideas involved between students. I love when professors encourage students to share their thoughts on different topics (current events, movies etc.) It just creates a fun learning environment. I think pursuing their major in PR here at Hofstra would be an interesting experience for those students.
    I have to agree with the challenges mentioned regarding the intensive writing involved, writing is an essential part of PR. As a foreigner, I find it very difficult to be a good writer. Which is the main reason at times, I question my desire to become a PR professional. I do understand the power of words in this industry and know that being a good writer is crucial.
    But, I think if PR is something that these students are passionate about and they have enough willpower to work twice as hard to become good writers, than they should be fine.

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  3. kenpow2012

    This article makes me very appreciative of the learning experiences that we have here at Hofstra. I love classrooms discussions and feel that these discussions help build the knowledge of not only students but sometimes the teachers. Everyday in class it is a learning experience with classroom discussions.

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  4. Cheyenne Padgett

    I find it so crazy that schools in other parts of the world do not hold discussions in the classroom like we do. I find that by discussing with your peers and teachers you gain a deeper sense of learning. Also having multiple cultural influences probably help a lot.

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  5. williamekanem

    The piece is actually an eye-opener to me, that there are societies where students don’t interact with instructors. A society where students role is just to listen, take notes and do little questioning—where then is the communication?
    An elementary meaning of communication is to share meaning; a one-way communication has never offered a good opportunity for effective communication. Come to think of it, would the prospective students even have the opportunity to practice PR upon graduation? This is because the bedrock of the profession is about interaction, America would no doubt extend a hand to them, but after that, back home, what happens? God help them!

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  6. elizah9

    I thinks it is amazing how a person from the other side of the world wants to come to school here in the United States. I also find it amazing that they are willing to put themselves through the challenge of learning and understanding another language. However, I do understand that an American public relations masters program is not going to be easy for someone who is not adjusted in our culture. If accepted, I am interested in seeing how the international students do in this program.

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  7. Jess Hershman

    I think it’s very interesting that students from China are willing to come here, although it means a total deviation from the learning style that they are used to. I believe that it is beneficial to them, however, because if they choose to go into international PR they will have the upper hand, as they will have had experience within the field in two completely different cultures. It also greatly benefits us because it will allow for us to learn more about their culture and how the field of public relations works in China.

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  8. Grace Finlayson

    I think this is an amazing opportunity for students abroad wanting to learn communication skills in different countries especially America. I had a Chinese exchange student in my mass media class last semester and she told me about the lecture structure that she was used to and how our mass media class scared her. Even though she was terrified at first she let me know that it was a very helpful experience to make her a better communicator.

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  9. Victoria Kotowski

    I definitely enjoyed this article because it was about a foreigner speaking nicely about the US for once! This is definitely interesting to me, because before I came for Hofstra, I was a student at Lehigh University where there were very few foreign students. My first day at Hofstra I was shocked to see that almost half of the people I met were from other countries. That is something I really enjoy about Hofstra, because I feel that it gives me a broader view of our world by being able to talk to these students. I was also surprised to hear that most of their classes are lectures. I’m grateful that at Hofstra most of my classes are very small because it’s definitely easier for me to learn in that type of classroom.

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  10. Dan Schaefer

    It is very interesting to me that the classroom environment is an element that drew these students to the United States, Throughout my high school and college careers I have been taught about the shortcomings of the American education system-something I always found very discouraging. It is refreshing for me to hear something like this.

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  11. Marc Carganilla

    The international students really do help teach american students about the world we live in. I think we learn as much from them as they do from us. And lets not forget international students are a great way of networking any careers that take us to new countries would certainly increase our chances of having friends abroad. For PR we can also see it as a way to internationally represent something and even match the cultural standards of another country.

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  12. Michele Colletti

    I think it is wonderful and inspiring when I see internationals around Hofstra’s campus. They had to really jump out of their comfort zone to come here and I could only imagine how difficult that must be for them. I believe that studying abroad is something everyone should do to open their eyes to a new way of life and a new way of thinking. I think we all can agree we have friends from all different cultures so lending a hand or opening our hearts to these exchange students isn’t very hard for most Americans to do. I am really excited for them to get the opportunity to use America and New York’s resources to better their education in the public relations field.

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  13. Rachel Massaro

    I always admire students who want to study in another country not just for a semester, but for all of their four years. I think it takes serious dedication and commitment and I believe that if accepted we should definitely extend a hand to them. It’s not easy to come to a new country alone with a language barrier and do well but if they have the motivation to do it then they have my support whole heartedly.

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  14. Katherine Hammer

    It is always inspiring to see people getting out of their comfort zone to follow their careers. Being an international student comes with many challenges, and to follow the PR profession into the United States shows how passionate these students are. Experiencing PR in different places of the world can help international students better understand how to affectively pursue their careers. I also believe having international students interested in PR to come to the U.S. can help reveal new ideas. Although the language barrier can be difficult, I believe it is worth it to have the diversity in the classroom, as well as in the profession.

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  15. Sarah Holzberg

    As a student you studied and lived aboard I feel that it is one of the best opportunities any person can have. Learning from people of an opposite culture not only is fun but it gives you a brand new perspective on life. America is vastly different from China which will be exciting for these students. I wish them luck and encourage them to jump into society here and take advantage to what America and New York have to offer.

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  16. Mike Cox

    It is exciting that Hofstra’s grad school extends to international students because it brings their cultures to ours. It it an important part of life to experience different types of cultures other than your own and i’m glad Hofstra can help fulfill this for some students. Coming to a different country means that they are going to have to learn to adjust in the moment but in the PR world that is everything.

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  17. javendaily

    I think it is great that we have international students in the program, especially from China, one of the most powerful nations in the world. We are always taught in this field to think global and act local. They are able to provide us with their unique experiences and teach us about their culture. To be successful public relations practitioners we have to be aware of what’s going on in other parts of the world, and what better way than to connect with international students directly. This is definitely beneficial for the growth of the program and our learning experience.

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  18. Heather Lanci

    It’s interesting to me that China, one of the most powerful nations in the world, thrives on this type of school system. The culture is so different. If the learning environment was like that in the US, many students would struggle to learn without being able to ask questions and have discussions. I wonder if it would be difficult for a Chinese student to adjust to our learning style. I think that it’s great that these students are interested in pursuing a higher education at Hofstra, and they should definitely get the opportunity to learn the way that we do.

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  19. carsoncuevas

    I have always thought that having international students present in any setting, makes for a more diverse and interesting situation. I think it is great that students want to perhaps get out of their comfort zone and pursue an education in America. When international and domestic students learn in the same classroom, I feel the classroom discussions become richer as more viewpoints come into play. I applaud those who want to pursue a degree in a program such as PR that is all about writing and communicating, in a language they most likely learned second to their native language.

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  20. Elana

    First of all, I was thrown off by your introduction! I was like, how could Professor Morosoff go to China and not share it with the class. I really enjoyed reading this article because I to can relate to the experiences of a foreigner. English was not really my first language and I struggled at a very young age to communicate with my peers. So now when I see international students from all over the globe, I have so much respect and appreciation for them. They have it much harder than we do because of the language and cultural barriers. I lover immersing myself in different cullers, I find it very empowering.

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  21. Priyanka Singh

    After being a a few PR and journalism classes with international students, I have to say, I really appreciate and find their outlook on the industry so interesting. I love the idea of them coming to New York and being culturally free of restriction to have hefty discussions about pretty much anything. Even though there are a lot of obstacles they have to overcome, it’s such an amazing experience for them to come here and see all of the different opportunities they have. I think they provide American students with a totally different perspective as well, because our cultures are in some ways very different from each other. I think there is a lot of pressure placed on all students to succeed, but it’s definitely much more concentrated with international students since they are so far away from home and also getting involved in a field that is already very competitive and complex. Regardless, I think having international perspectives analyzing and participating in vivid discussions about the communications field is always beneficial and they should have the opportunity to experience it here.

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  22. nnicolegd

    It takes a lot of hard work to proficiently learn the English language as a non-native speaker. Considering Chinese languages share little or no linguistics similarities with English, the transition will be difficult, though not impossible. As a result, I still feel those students in question should be given the opportunity if they are willing to put forth the effort.

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  23. Ashley Fazio

    It is great that international students want to broaden their horizons and come to America to learn more about our culture. New York is known as a melting pot and is the perfect place to go as an international student, and as a person interested in public relations. Sometimes we as Americans forget how fortunate we are to receive the help that we do from our professors. It must be a nice change of pace for the international students not used to that kind of one on one attention.

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  24. robinperkins1

    I think this a great opportunity for students in China to be able to come to the United States and put some of their skills and knowledge to use from their undergrad. It’s great to be able to explore a different culture other then your own. I am a PR student and I would love to be able to study abroad one day and learn about other cultures.

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  25. clester6

    I think it is great that we give students from around the world the opportunity to come learn in a different setting. I, myself am thinking about studying abroad next semester in Italy and if it weren’t for the willingness of the University to let me into their campus and work with an outsider to give me the experience of a lifetime, I wouldn’t get the chance to do this. It makes me feel like people generally care about each other and want to see all of us grow and do good in life and they want us to have those types of experiences to better ourselves and gain experience.

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  26. Cass Lang

    Though the language and cultural barriers will prove to be difficult for any international students accepted into the MA PR program, I believe they will strive and rise to the challenge. The international students I have met here, at Hofstra, have proven themselves 100 times over and happen to be some of the most inspiring and driven people I have ever known. They are willing to do whatever it takes to achieve their goals, starting with uprooting their lives and moving across the world, and most times going against what is expected of them. I believe the international students will benefit from the experiences they will have in a real american classroom environment, as I believe we will also benefit from interacting with them. The best way to learn is by gaining experience and there is so much that we would be able to learn from each other.

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  27. msvonne88

    It always amazes me to learn about how International students are determined to learn more about the American culture. To know that students are willing to leave their countries to come here, motivates me to strive harder. I admire their drive to adapt to experience the American lifestyle.

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  28. Anjelica Johnson

    It is great that you are able to easily interview these students via Skype! The fact that they are interested in a completely different experience coming to an American graduate program and seem eager to learn will be a great and valuable lesson for them. They will definitely learn a lot about the PR world in class and from being so close to NYC.

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  29. Tamara Russo

    Cultural differences extends to the classrooms, a concept that I never thought of until now. It’s great that these Chinese students want to learn in a different manner than what they’re used to, and American classrooms can provide different styles of learning to help them both academically and professionally.

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  30. Nicholas Mazzarella

    Professor Morosoff:

    It’s remarkable how easy it is to communicate in today’s digital age. For you, a 7,000-mile difference is not a problem thanks to Skype. For public relations practitioners, a social media message can reach people whom they didn’t know existed. Furthermore, I like how the Chinese students touched on things that many American students might take for granted. The opportunities that Hofstra’s proximity to New York City offer, the two-way conversation that takes place between professors and students in the classroom, and the help that we’re offered by those around us are phenomena that seem like the norm to us. Lastly, I can only imagine how difficult it is for foreign students to adjust to English grammar and AP style – things that many Americans have trouble mastering.

    -Nick Mazzarella

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  31. Kimberly Minto

    I can honestly say that I love the American classroom environment, I like being able to have discussions about a point of view that may be different than expected. At the same time, being a child of immigrants, I see the differences between the American classroom and others. In my opinion each setting has its own advantages and disadvantages, but that doesn’t mean I would change my experiences.

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  32. Nicole Romeo

    No matter where you go in the world, especially to a foreign country you will more than likely have a language barrier between you and the person and or people you are trying to communicate with. Needless to say, an international student learning in a classroom with students who all speak the same language can be quite difficult but in the end is very rewarding. They would learn a great deal about our culture and our own perspective on certain things.

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  33. s5n1el

    It is truly interesting how we are viewed as helpful as a country in certain places of the world, and the oppressive giant in others. I think that the USA should also considering sending our students abroad, and make our education system one of self-improvement, and not of competition.

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  34. Rock(Shi Yan)

    I usual ask people, “have you ever been to China?” But When people ask me “do you love U.S.?”, I tell them “Yes, I love it here.” For me everything is brand new. There is totally different culture here when compared to China. Studying in the U.S. widens my horizons. China has a big population, and in China the competition is fierce. Chinese parents want their kids to study abroad because it helps them get a higher salary job when they go back. Actually Chinese students who want to study abroad have a Financial problem, Language problem, culture problem, VISA problem and so on. It is really hard for them. Now every country has international students. It proves that studying abroad is a popular thing. I encourage everyone to study everywhere. One world, one dream, we should all share.

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  35. Marissa Slattery

    The American classroom environment, particularly that of Hofstra’s MA in PR program, fosters an environment where dialogue between students and the professor is not only welcome, but encouraged. I believe that this give-and-take style of exchanging ideas and information is not only useful in that you may learn more on whatever topic is presently being debated, but also, in learning a skill that will come in handy in the working world when brainstorming and bouncing ideas off of co-workers. Lecture learning, while it may serve a purpose in the distribution of information, does not encourage questioning or insightful thought.

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  36. Deana Meccariello

    I think the public relations program here at Hofstra is particularly good at fostering classroom discussion. I feel like the openness we have in our classes (and willingness to sometimes go off on a tangent longer than we need to,) has led me to learn more than any lecture style class could. I think this style of learning is wonderful for international students to experience and embrace.

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  37. Andrew Manning

    It’s hard for me to have an objective point of view, and obviously every educational system has its positives and negatives, but I consider myself very lucky to have learned via the American model. I know my own weaknesses, and feel I wouldn’t be able to take much a way from a lesson if I didn’t have some level of interaction; I would probably just drop off.
    I spent some time in Ireland, and spoke with some University students who described their educational experience similarly to how you described that of students in China. While this probably wouldn’t be an issue with areas of study loaded with facts that need to be memorized, I imagine it’d be very difficult to make the most out of a public relations program this way.

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  38. vfrazzzetto1

    I had a hard time getting acclimated to a new place being only 100 miles away, just 1/70th of the distance these international students will travel. I enjoy seeing the interaction between international students, as they diversify the campus. I, like many other American students, especially at a private institution such as this take advantage of the very open classroom environment. Not taking into account how the culture within classrooms in other countries can be.

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  39. Gabrielle Furman

    I think having exchange students will be very beneficial. They will be able to experience learning in a different environment. Also, we will be able to observe how they are learning in a new atmosphere. I myself, don’t know how they lean the the way that they do. I need to be in a classroom that’s interactive and can ask questions if needed. Overall, i think that it will open up their horizons and is a good way for them to get involved with the learning process here.

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  40. Taylla Smith

    I think it is great that Hofstra offers a program for international students to gain their intelligent at our university. I can only imagine that the international students would have a challenge with American culture compared to Asian culture. Especially, when teaching public relations to these students, it may seem like they are stepping completely out of their comfort zone while trying to learn how to connect with other individuals. But, that is also the beauty of public relations because you have to have knowledge about all cultures and reach demographic in a positive light. In some ways, the international students have an advantage because of the understanding of their own culture and the willingness learn about other cultures.

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  41. Jen O'Malley

    First of all, I absolutely admire international students. It takes a great deal of courage and motivation to leave your country for any reason, let alone to learn in an English speaking classroom. Graduate school is a challenge to begin with. For a student to be willing to attend grad school and learn in a language other than their native one proves how dedicated they are to succeeding in their chosen field. I also think it’s a great opportunity for American students to learn from their foreign peers. In terms of PR, being able to effectively communicate with different people from different places is a valuable skill. Together, both American and international students can take advantage of learning together to expand their educational and professional experiences.

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  42. NMendes1

    It is amazing to see that the little things we take for granted, such as our fellow student being helpful; are important elements that some students are dying to experience. The noticeable difference in school culture is very intriguing and it is always awesome to get some insight on how students on the other side of the world are learning. It is great that they want to come here to learn because the diversity will add body to the conversations held in the classroom as well as be a teaching experience for everyone involved. I wish them the best of luck!

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  43. keyanamichelle13

    People always say studying abroad in a foreign country is extremely beneficial. Coming to America as a international student I think better prepares you for the real world. Not only are you learning how to become successful in your intended career field but you are also learning a whole new culture and lifestyle, adapting to situations that you aren’t accustom to. It’s a rewarding helpful experience that hopefully one of the students interviewed gets to experience.

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  44. Ariana Queenan

    I am a student employee at the Multicultural and Student Programs Office (MISPO) here at Hofstra and I have a number of international friends. This information does not shock me much, because I am constantly hearing an internal student’s commentary on life in the U.S. With that commentary I frequently hear the benefits international students gain from studying in the U.S. One of the assistant directors in MISPO earned her undergraduate degree in China. She once told me a story of how she would always fall asleep during her Professor’s lectures, because they were so boring.

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  45. Jennifer Im

    Though I haven’t stepped foot on Asian soil in over fourteen, no, fifteen years now, I’ve learned about their education system through secondary means. At the very least, South Korea is notorious for their often forceful one-sided classroom mannerisms. And once a student enters college, it’s socially acceptable for him/her to finally slack off.
    Also, I’ve wondered how some international students will be able to cope with the level of English required for PR. Even with impeccable grammar, a strong accent can truly interfere with communication and how the audience perceives you. Unlike Korea’s education system, I’ve witnessed firsthand as employees grumbled about my parent’s illiteracy, thinking no one could hear them. Unfortunately, many Americans, myself included at times, unknowingly discriminate against those with broken English or a heavy accent. Instead of actually trying to converse, we brush them off like we do with children’s incoherent babbles. Hopefully, as culture continues to traverse borders, we’ll grow more accepting of them.

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  46. Jazmin Quinci

    I’m in awe of students who leave their homelands to study in a new country. It must be frightening and very thrilling. International students who have the resources and opportunity to study in America are very fortunate. Of course as a native New Yorker, I’d say there’s no better place to have fun like New York City! I wish these students the best of luck and success.

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  47. Christina Michael

    I feel as though they will greatly benefit from an open and intereactive classroom environment despite the difficulites they may face in terms of language and writing. Also, the international students will be able to provide a different perspective in many PR situations because they’ve had different experiences and are from a different culture than many of us are.

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  48. rebeccaanncosta

    As Americans, we are generally narrow minded when it comes to the education system. Most of us just assume education in America is the same as it is everywhere else. The openness of the classrooms at Hofstra and the opportunities to actively participate is something we take for granted. It’s an experience for students from all around the world to come and learn about the classroom culture and take advantage of the opportunities the Hofstra has to offer.

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  49. afairc1

    With technology now a days I think it is amazing how many opportunities students have so study across the world. Being in America we have so many resources and major cities that have tons of great opportunities to learn and make a name for yourself. While I do agree that learning something can vary depending on the culture you learn it from I think when you learn in America it is easier to get different cultures inputs on the subject. Since we have foreign exchange students or others who choose to move here later in life to make a living we constantly have the ability to learn more on a topic from people of different cultures.

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  50. Abby Drapeau

    I think it’s great that students have the ability to study almost anywhere in the world. We sometimes forget how fortunate we are studying at Hofstra with so many resources at our finger tips. I think this is a reminder how we should be taking advantage of this opportunity, something that we easily look past. I agree with what a lot of people are saying how interesting it is that the learning experience is so different in other countries.

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  51. Nicholas Taddeo

    First off, how awesome is technology that now, we’re able too communicate with people around the world and conduct “face-to-face” interviews with people who live in China. Also I love how that one student who you interviewed was impressed by the helpfulness of Americans; that brings me great pride that my fellow Americans give off that vibe (might just be a Cali thing though). Lastly, I think it is very courageous that some of these people are willing to risk everything to travel to a completely different nation in hopes to pursue their dreams/careers. I do hope they qualify, and hope I’m given the chance to extend my hands and help them on their voyage to success.

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  52. Vanessa Felder

    My roommate is an international student and often shares how much she appreciates the learning environment here in America. It amazes me how culturally different we are in terms of academics. I think that it is great opportunity for international students to come and learn. Just as long as they understand that the transition into the PR program will be hard, but not impossible if they put in the work and try.

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  53. gluisi

    I think that accepting these international students into the graduate program would not only expand their learning, but it will also benefit the students who are from this country. I know from personal experience that when I have an international student in my classes I enjoy watching the way they read, write and interpret things because it gives me insight into they way people from across the world work. I find it interesting to see someone from across the world enjoy the same study of mine.

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  54. Taylor Lawrence

    This is very interesting because I have never really given any thought to how different education may be in different countries. When I say different I do not necessarily mean the content, but really the actual learning environment. It is nice to see other nations yearn to want a learning environment as great as ours. I am sure if they apply themselves they can succeed greatly here.

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  55. Jenn Pizzurro

    I feel that it is fantastic that Hofstra puts such an emphasis on recruiting international students. I feel that not only do they benefit from the experience of being in the Communications Capital of the World, but we as American students also benefit from studying with people from other cultures who share our views of communications theories and practices. All in all it is a win-win situation and it is wonderful that Hofstra puts such a great emphasis on international recruiting.

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  56. David Pepe

    I am always impressed to see international students in PR programs especially with how important language is in the industry and how it is used as both a tool and means of communication. It shows that with hard work and determination you can achieve anything. I think the small classroom setting where students and professors can have discussion is critical to understanding the PR industry. I have been in lecture style classes and it sometimes has been much harder to learn and discuss anything in more detail.

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  57. Rachel Tyler

    I think it is great international students want to come to America to better there public relations education thus far. I can only imagine the language barrier, in both the speaking and writing aspects, to be a difficult obstacle for international students. International students are coming to America to thrive in a culture that is different from their own. They understand the challenges that they are going to face and I believe that will inspire them to work even harder. Overall, having international students in the classroom allows for a more diverse environment, which everyone can benefit from.

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  58. Daylen Orlick

    When I pledged my fraternity last semester, one of pledge brothers was an international student from Beijing. He told me the biggest reason why he was joining the fraternity was not for the brotherhood, but to learn our language better and to gain connections. I find it very admirable that foreign exchange students work so incredibly hard to learn, and adapt to our culture. Though both of our PR cultures are vastly different, getting experience in the states in the PR industry they will be even better in the long run.

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  59. Maria Emlano

    I think it is great that these students are making such strides in not only going to graduate school in the US, but majoring in PR where they will have to be proficient in writing in the English language. I am curious as to whether these students have a long-term goal of staying in the United States to work in PR or if they hope to ever work in China’s PR industry. I believe that learning a completely new language and immersing yourself in a foreign culture is an admirable feat.

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  60. Olivia Hayum

    I am studying abroad next semester, and while London is not as drastically different as China is to America, I’m still curious with how it will compare. I do think it is a great thing, that these students have the opportunity to come here, and to know that they will make friends and receive help in a learning environment so different from what they are used to.

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  61. jheiden1

    One of my good friends is an international student from Shanghai and she says the education simply does not compare. I sometimes take for granted how much Hofstra offers and prepares students for the future. As frightening as it seems to study abroad for school, it’s nice to see so many young people take initiative for their future successes.

    Reply
  62. Paulina Zaferiou

    I think we definitely take for granted the ease with which we can learn and reach out to professors for help. It would be interesting to see how these students fare in the American PR courses, as opposed to Chinese PR, considering how different the two countries are.

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  63. emilyrwalsh

    I think it is so wonderful that international students want to come to America to learn more about the profession of public relations. While it gives them the experience of living, interning, and working in the U.S., it also gives us the experience to learn through them. It gives us a more diverse classroom to be a part of, and I think that everyone benefits and learns more as a result. Even though our PR culture differs from theirs, this gives us the chance to feed off one another and learn even more about how to work in the PR world. It’s always wonderful to be open and learn about different cultures and values.

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  64. geow1

    As an international student, I find the approach towards learning in the classroom as a rewarding experience. Ideas and thoughts are debated with sustainability in mind, freely. It is definitely a rewarding experience to be able to learn from different perspectives and cultures.

    Reply

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