On PeRsonalization of content

Steve Rubel

Steve Rubel

Steve Rubel is an interesting guy with an interesting job. As chief content strategist for Edelman, the world’s largest privately owned public relations company, Rubel spends his days (and nights) studying how, why and when people use the Internet. His role is to watch and anticipate trends in social media and online applications, and see how humans interact with all their available technology.

Rubel, a Hofstra graduate, spoke at Fair Media Council’s annual Summer Social Media Boot Camp on July 10 which featured best practices, tips and advice for businesses and nonprofit organizations. Some of the statistics he quoted were mind-blowing. For example, 60 percent of all media consumption is now taking place on smart phones. One billion–billion!–photos are uploaded every day. People rarely go directly to web sites; they mostly use intermediaries, platforms, links, apps, and aggregate sites to get there.

Rubel’s presentation gave the audience a lot to consider. “Algorithms are the new intermediaries,” he told the group. As most of us know, algorithms are essential to the way computers process data. Each time we use our computers and smart phones, we’re shaping algorithms for the next time we use them. The result is increased personalization of the content that winds up on our screens. Rubel believes we’ll see more and more personalized information, and it’s up to professional communicators to create content to achieve this. He also suggested:

  • Communicators need to pay more attention to what happens to content after it’s posted.
  • We must look for synergy and synchronicity by finding ways to attach social media to everything we do and put order to the content so it’s truly effective. “Social media is like air now,” Rubel said. “It’s everywhere in our lives.”
  • Everything we pitch to media and create online should have multiple uses and impressions. Earned and social media must generate other opportunities.

Rubel concluded by asking us to think of the web and social media like individual stars in a dark sky. If sites, platforms and applications are stars, we need to turn them into constellations by connecting them. Your thoughts?

 

 

 

 

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