Screwed-up PRiorities

      44 Comments on Screwed-up PRiorities

If ISIS terrorists or North Koreans had booked a room at Las Vegas’s Mandalay Bay Hotel and fired on a crowd of thousands–killing 58 and wounding more than 500–millions of Americans would support going to war to defeat them. But because it was an American who purchased these guns legally, little-to-nothing will be done to stop it from happening again. Call it a double standard or whatever you like, but many would agree we have terribly screwed-up priorities.

Andy Borowitz

Last week, New Yorker humorist Andy Borowitz wrote this angry, satirical piece (I slightly edited this for space):

Many Americans are tired of explaining things to idiots, particularly when the things in question are so painfully obvious, a new poll indicates… The fact that climate change will cause catastrophic habitat destruction and devastating extinctions tops the list, with a majority saying that they will no longer bother trying to explain this to cretins. Coming in a close second, statistical proof that gun control has reduced gun deaths in countries around the world is something that a significant number of those polled have given up attempting to break down for morons.

Finally, a majority said that trying to make idiots understand why a flag that symbolizes bigotry and hatred has no business flying over a state capitol only makes the person attempting to explain this want to put his or her fist through a wall… An overwhelming number of those polled said that they were considering abandoning such attempts altogether, with a broad majority agreeing with the statement, “This country is exhausting.”

I often wonder if some brilliant public relations campaign could convince lawmakers to take significant action slowing access to weapons of war. The power and the money gun lobbyists possess, in the guise of protecting the Second Amendment, have always blocked proposals for real change.

We should all be angry. One hundred people die each day in automobile accidents, and the day may come when mass shootings become as routine as car crashes in this country. The headlines will stop and we’ll go on as if this is acceptable. Your thoughts?

44 thoughts on “Screwed-up PRiorities

  1. Kerry Lowery

    If a PR campaign can in anyway influence law makers or major leaders then that would be amazing. Unfortunately the doesn’t work that way. These incidents seem like they’re going to continue to happen until everyone has reached a collective agreement about the dangers of gun safety and metal health. However, if a PR campaign can get the major influencers to speak openly about these issues and get the ball rolling on discussion of this topic then I say more to power to ya.

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  2. Katrina Tacconelli

    I don’t like how it is a 2 way street. If we were in another country, They would go after those people and kill them. If we lived in Russia they are very strong people. If they say they are going to come after you you better be ready for an attack. I ask myself this question as all of us do. Even though gun laws should be stricter if 5 of those people who were killed owned guns do you think the gun man would have been killed/ injured sooner not too hurt and kill so many people. No matter how strict you make the gun laws people are still going to own guns. How far are you wiling to go to protect people. Attacks are going to happen, do you think people should be able to own a weapon to defend themselves in cases of these events?

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  3. Forrest Gitlin

    Any sort of PR campaign to convince lawmakers to do anything will have to altogether forget about the lawmakers. While that sounds like an oxymoron, the truth is that lawmakers respond to two forces: donors and voters. If a PR campaign finds a way to inspire donors to out fund a group with opposing views, they have dramatically increased their odds of winning over politicians. Furthermore, if a campaign inspires voters to consider an issue important enough to support or oppose politicians based on their stances, then the likelihood that elected officials of similar views holding office increases as well.

    Unfortunately for many causes, not just gun control, these efforts to win over donors and voters are often overshadowed by new local, global, or national events. Additionally, the frequency by which some of these topics are mentioned in the news has desensitized the country, making these efforts an uphill battle.

    It seems unlikely to me that national sentiment on these issue will change rapidly in the next few years. But, people are changing their minds ever so slowly.

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  4. Anthony Ferrufino

    I know we would all love to think that a PR Campaign has the power to change the minds of lawmakers but that is simply not the case. For lawmakers it’s all about reelection and campaign funds. According to the Washington post since 1998, the NRA has donated $3,533,294 to current members of Congress. With all those donations comes influence over the republican agenda regarding gun regulation. I believe that the only true way to achieve common sense gun reform is to reverse the decision of Citizen United, which equated money to speech and allowed for unlimited amounts of donation by corporations or organization to a campaign. If we remove the NRA from the equation I believe that there is enough consensus among our legislators to implement common sense safeguards to protect Americans.

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  5. Aisha S. Buchanan

    It is disgusting how these situations keep happening but nothing is being done about it. This topic has been an exhausting topic for some time. If a PR campaign can help change the laws regarding gun control, that’ll be great. It would have to be one heck of a campaign for the lawmakers to even consider any changes.

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  6. Maya

    I feel like this country has reached a point of normalcy when it comes to gun violence and I think it’s going to be very hard to shake. I don’t know if it’s the pessimist in me, but I really don’t see how this issue is going to ever be resolved, as long as the government and activist groups have a say. The gridlock in Washington over this issue seems to be at a complete standstill and I can’t imagine any type of public relations campaign that will allow change and legislation to fight the gun violence problem. I get the frustration people have in saying we, as Americans, need to do something about this, but what realistically can we do? What actual result will calling our local senators have? I honestly thought that shooting at that congressional baseball game earlier this year would have woken up Congress to the reality of the issue since the victims were congressmen, but it didn’t. Their latest move is to pass legislation that would make silencers more easily available, so what does that say about progress?

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  7. Joe Barone

    It really is a shame that these mass shootings have become the norm. We turn on the TV and hear a death toll growing and growing each time it takes place. It’s awful. With that said, nothing will be done to convince gun lobbyists. The almighty dollar is what holds lawmakers back from doing something about the issue.

    Personally, I believe there is more of a mental health problem in this country than an actual gun problem. We should be tackling THAT, first and foremost, then address the weapons of war. Yes, it was a disgusting act – not taking anything away from it. But, no sane individual wakes up one day with the intent to kill an innocent civilian. It doesn’t make sense. Despite the lack of findings, the Las Vegas shooter was mentally damaged. If we can stop ignoring the true problem – mental health – that’ll be the first step. There are law-abiding citizens who carry guns. Is it right? That’s up to you to decide. To each his or her own, right? But, would a mentally sane person shoot at 500 other sane individuals just for the sake of it? No. Let’s address this mental health problem. That’s the true issue here.

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  8. Gianna Losquadro

    No public relations campaign is going to open the eye’s of lawmakers, if anything that’s become more obvious as time has gone on. The issue, like seen in this article, is how defensive each party gets. Regardless of your political party and your feelings about the second amendment, if you’re American and human, you’ve realized that something has to change. We can’t keep going on waiting for the next event to take action. Something needs to change; something needed to change in 2012. Or 1999. Any action or decision taken is not going to appeal to everyone, it’s not going to fix everything. But if we do nothing, we’re essentially asking for it to happen again.

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  9. Daniella Opabajo

    I have always believed that this national priority is messed up. It has almost because common to see stories about a mass shooting every couple of months., soon it will be every couple of weeks. The discussion on gun control is still not made a priority. Instead, news stories like the NFL protest get the spotlight. I do believe that a PR campaign can help educate and shed light on the impact of guns being in the hands of the wrong people. The campaign could include some victims of mass shooting family members and people who have actually been involved in a mass shooting. I am not sure if this tactic would help stop gun violence but it is a step in the right direction to get the conversation started.

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  10. olivia abbatiello

    Gun violence is an epidemic in this country and the fact that there is a large portion of the population who does not believe in passing legislation to prevent more mass shootings to occur is mind boggling. Most attribute their defense of the right to bear arms to either the centuries old 2nd Amendment, or use the ideology of ‘well, if the bad guys have gun, shouldn’t I be able to have one to defend myself?”nBoth of these approaches ignore the simple fact that the ordinary person does not need the ability to own a weapon that could kill hundreds with the simple pull of a trigger. While I do believe there are responsible firearm owners in this country, who take into account precautions and laws necessary to possess a dangerous weapon in the safest way possible, there are far too many who do not. With simple legislation like increased background checks or not selling to those with domestic violence pasts, on a FEDERAL level, thousands of lives will be spared. Its simple and this is not a ‘both sides’ argument, gun control should not only be common sense, but common law.

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    1. Summer

      It’s interesting that the NRA remains silent on mass shootings and don’t release campaigns on the importance of gun control. People are up in arms that NFL players are kneeling and that confederate flags and monuments are being taken down everywhere. But why are people so upset or threatened by the dismantling of monuments of divisive and hatred? It doesn’t help that Trump is encouraging this inflammatory rhetoric. Our priorities are screwed up as a nation. I think PR campaigns towards lobbyists and specifically government entities could help but not truly solve the problem. Hatred is something that is learned and is hard to undo. Many Americans are afraid of their resources and rights being taken away to help those who weren’t afforded the same opportunities.

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  11. Derrica Newman

    I agree with Andy’s statement. I can’t believe that tragic things like this still happen in 2017. The fact that people cannot go to a concert and actually enjoy themselves hurts my heart. I have been to numerous festivals and concerts, I’ve never thought that my life could be at risk because of a potential mass shooting. I do not want to think that mass shootings will become something that is normalized, because that is ludicrous. As citizens of this country we should not have to walk around in constant fear. The government needs to take action and do something about this. How far is to far? I personally feel like no one should be granted a gun, I do not see the purpose. I hope things get better in the future, but from the looks of it the state of our country is up in the air.

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  12. Matt Howard

    I think being angry is appropriate and justified. Andy Borowitz captures well the idea that it is frustrating to have the same argument about gun control over and over with no new results.

    The concept of a public relations campaign focused around convincing the appropriate people to ditch the money and power gun lobbyists possess. If there is a way to direct an effective argument that both captures the dangers of gun lobbyists and captures the attention of people who normally wouldn’t listen to a gun control argument, I don’t know it.

    Public relations campaigns to encourage policy change seem significant but difficult. To make people change embedded ideologies is challenging. An effective campaign would have to been shocking and inspire emotions for people to change their minds I’d think.

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  13. John Grillea

    Great post by Patrick. Obviously what happened is disgusting, heartbreaking and should never occur anywhere, but we also have additional issues in our country that kill people much more frequently. People like this sick man will obtain firearms legally or illegally, but all of these purchases should have certainly been a red flag! I don’t think this would have been avoided if there were gun laws were any different. I think we can all agree that someone who is capable of committing a sin like this doesn’t care much about following the law.

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  14. Patrick Picarsic

    I couldn’t help but look up the CDC’s statistics on what actually kills Americans:

    Heart disease: 633,842
    Cancer: 595,930
    Chronic lower respiratory diseases: 155,041
    Accidents (unintentional injuries): 146,571
    Stroke (cerebrovascular diseases): 140,323
    Alzheimer’s disease: 110,561
    Diabetes: 79,535
    Influenza and Pneumonia: 57,062
    Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis: 49,959
    Intentional self-harm (suicide): 44,193

    I believe 30,000 deaths are attributed to firearms, which 2/3-or-so are suicides, so actual gun-related homicides hover around 10,000 give-or-take. Most of those crimes aren’t committed with “assault rifles” or long rifles, but with small-caliber handguns. Heart disease and cancer absolutely crush this number!
    Now I don’t want to seem unsympathetic to victims of mass-shootings, nor to their families, but if we were to get our “priorities” straight, we wouldn’t be spending all this time, energy, and public debate on gun-control, until we have addressed the issues that REALLY kill Americans; LIFESTYLE. Heart disease and cancer.
    McDonalds and the fast foods industry kills more people every year than our “epidemic gun problem,” but there doesn’t seem to be much outrage. It’s actually ridiculed. Michelle Obama’s school lunch initiative had more potential to save lives than the complete repeal of the 2nd Amendment.
    We need food and exercise regulation and reform. Devoting all this time to minimizing gun deaths is completely inefficient.

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  15. Chris Bounds

    In my own opinion, I can understand what this person is talking about. If the day were to come where mass shootings were as normal as car crashes. America would have lost its most important values. THis country is supposed to be a place where people and live together with the assumption that the government will not allow such atrocities to take place or escalate in scale. It is also sad that there is a double standard for gunmen in this nation. Although, some might think that there isn’t a double standard there sadly is. The media only spend a couple of days covering this most recent mass shooting, which I think is bizzare compared to other instances involving ISIS or middle eastern looking people.

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  16. Nichole Bingham

    I think that car crashes and deadly shootings are unacceptable in our society. It is sad that we have grown accustomed to car accidents as a daily thing. I feel that a drunk driver that crashes into another driver, killing them in the process, should be as news worthy as the mass shootings. Too many people are dying due to these causes and it needs to stop. It doesn’t matter whether the person is an American or not, it is wrong to take away the lives of innocent people. The lives we are living are based on the choices we make and we must choose them wisely.

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  17. Justin Ayala

    I would love to believe that this incident would actually spark change when it comes to gun control, but I honestly do not know. If nothing is done to better gun control, these events will continue to happen and the more it’ll happen, the more desensitized we will become to it. Mass shootings do not and should not be normalized as well the suspects of these shootings. The fact that this man had complete control of this situation and all power was in his hands is a problem. People do not need to focus on why this happened but instead how it was to happen.

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  18. Steven Freitag

    I am one of those people Andy Borowitz describes where I cannot deal with explaining things to people anymore because some people are too ignorant to outside ideas or thoughts. Americans especially need to see other people’s perspectives and not only care about their own opinions. We’re at a point in time where congress cannot get anything done because of bipartisanship. Congress used to work and compromise in order to get bills passed and advance the legislative agenda. Maybe a few of the good lobbyists along with the best PR people in the business could come up with a campaign that will shatter everyone’s ideas and create a unified push towards gun control.

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  19. Matthew Leong

    Often, when an American commits an act of violence, he/she is called a “lone wolf”. This is likely because the public does not want to believe that someone who is an American would operate under or with a terrorist organization. But, in reality, anyone who commits an act of terror, should in fact be considered a terrorist. The problem is that mass gun shootings occur more often than anyone would like. People who want guns can say that they are responsible all they want. The problem is, society needs to run as fast as its slowest person. It should only take one person’s mistake to ruin it for everyone else. Unfortunately, gun control is so very hard to be established in a way that pleases everyone.

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  20. Paula Chirinos

    II like how the discussion that took place last class is being brought up again. The issue of gun violence seems to have an interesting pattern with how the government chooses to act upon it. I can agree with my peers, that whenever a non-american causes such a tragedy, America is ready to go to war essentially. I don’t agree however, that nothing is done when an American causes this. There has been a massive investigation into this incident since the day of the shooting and a lot of leads have been made in a matter of less than a week. The fault is essentially in the policies ,or lack thereof, made after such incidents. Reform definitely needs to be made and immediately. Someone needs to take the lead on this.

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  21. Haley Nemeth

    If a bridge collapses it is built again to be stronger, if an airplane is unsafe more safety measures are put in place, but if a mass shooting happens nothing is done to fix the problem. It is heartbreaking to see more severe mass shootings as the year (and time in general) goes on, but why are people still so blind to the fact that change needs to happen? I think a strong PR campaign could have some effect on the public ‘s and legislator’s views of gun control, but there will also be a counter PR campaign that strives to keep the gun laws the same. Just because living in “this country is exhausting” does not mean that there shouldn’t be a constant push for change. Hopefully the country will wake up before, like the article said, mass shootings become as common as car accidents.

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  22. McKenna Heim

    I think it’s funny with all of this modern day technology and research and social development that we have that we cannot outline clear ideals and points that need to be made. I’m not going to act like I’m originally and made this, but recently I saw a tweet that kind of went along the lines of “Birth control? Restrict it. Health insurance? Restrict it. Abortions? Ban them. Guns? Look, limiting the peoples’ freedom doesn’t work.” It was a very thought provoking thing to see because I am extremely passionate about the lack of gun-restriction in America. THOSE GUNS WERE L E G A L L Y MODIFIED TO K I L L! And not animals! It was with malicious intent. What else would you be shooting?

    To get back to the point, my thoughts are that we racially profile too much, and ISIS actually did claim responsibility for this attack, but that claim was provided without evidence. I’ve seen so many headlines calling this shooter ‘mentally ill’. First of all, yes, mentally ill people do act up, but as someone who has quite a few (and has also grown to conquer) quite a few of these illnesses, I can say that I am disappointed with the negative connotation it is giving people who actually try to cope and struggle with the defecits as well as try to embrace it and spread awareness about mental health as well. SECOND, although he did purchase the guns legally, the real question is–why were they legal in the first place??? These weapons are made to KILL PEOPLE! NOT HUNT! THE MODIFICATIONS WERE SAID TO BE LEGAL TOO WHICH MAKES IT EVEN MORE QUESTIONABLE!
    THIRD, this needs to stop. I have several colleagues and friends that live in the Las Vegas Strip near where the shooting occurred and they were all actually on tour at the moment so they were not harmed but I was so so afraid and we should never have to feel that kind of fear.

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  23. Jeffrey Werner

    I agree that there’s a double standard when it comes to the Las Vegas shooting. Our priorities are definitely mixed up. If anyone else with a different ethnicity than white had committed this crime, we would be crying for war, but because it was a white American, we all fall silent. Is that to say that we’ll get to a point where mass shootings occur everyday and nobody cares? No, I don’t think we’ll reach that point, but the longer we prolong the discussion, the more lives are lost. This isn’t about gun control or the Second Amendment, it’s about keeping the American people safe.

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  24. Jessica Gilmour

    I think that the idea of gun control is so taboo to some because of the correlation guns have to one’s constitutional right. Some people connect the further control of guns and who owns them as stripping away some sort of promise they were given. If guns were more controlled it is a pure fact that there would be less shootings. Taking away semi automatic weaponry from the mentally ill is not only appropriate but crucial to the termination of mass gun violence. Revising the constitution is not a way to strip away rights but to update them to fit appropriately with a world that is vastly different than before. Home grown terrorism is oddly less vilified than terrorists from other countries. Although the acts they perform are the same, their reactions from the public are very different. Something needs to change, something needs to open the public’s eyes to reveal that mass shootings should not be a common story in the news.

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  25. Shayla Sales

    I agree that the priorities of our nation are screwed up and I also believe that gun control is not and has never been a priority for our government. As mentioned in the article, “the power and the gun money” that is invested into this industry is too much of a profit to slow or halt. The United States of America is genuinely run on money and power and how to continuously accumulate more of it. I do not see gun control laws/proposals being passed anywhere in the near future. It is frustrating to sit around as a citizen in a democratic society, that has little interest for the safety of its people and, ultimately, watch those who have invested into this industry make profit off the deaths effected by their products. It’s no new secret that gun control is problem in our nation; you see it everyday when you turn on your television or open a newspaper. Massacres and deaths by guns have become terrifyingly common and it has been one too many domestic terrorist attacks for the government not to take action. If this problem were a priority laws and legislation would have been passed by now.

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  26. czackarypenn

    The fact that events like this are becoming a regularity is awful and people should absolutely be outraged with gun lobbyists and continue to attempt to increase gun control. The United States has more deaths from gun violence than any other country by far, yet many feel that “protecting our second amendment right” is more important than protecting thousands upon thousands of future lives. When the second amendment was written, guns could only hold one bullet. Additionally, the founding fathers wrote in the ability to amend the constitution so that when modern advancements occurred, we could change laws to adjust to present day society. The fact that many people would wage war immediately against North Korea if they did the same thing shows the type of war that citizens should be waging to try to make a change to gun control laws.

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  27. Raffaella Tonani

    “The day may come when mass shootings become as routine as car crashes in this country. The headlines will stop and we’ll go on as if this is acceptable”

    I think attacks like the one in Vegas are becoming more and more accepted. However I do not think it is a problem limited to the U.S. I think it is a global problem how we are becoming indifferent to losing lives everyday. According to the Syrian Network For Human Rights (SNHR), 5381 civilians from which 1159 children have been killed on the first six months of 2017. Why are we not talking about ways to prevent this everyday? Why is this number not in the headlines being updated daily? It is only human to be more shocked when deaths happen closer to home. Maybe I am wrong, but I feel that even in cases closer to home, unless you knew one of the injured or killed, we start forgetting how we felt when it was first “Breaking news!”

    “Living in America is exhausting” I do not think it is more or less exhausting than other countries. I think living in a country makes you more informed about the pros and cons about it. I want to emphasize the word informed, because only an informed population has the power to demand the media to keep covering, in other words giving importance to serious events like the Harvest Festival shooting. It does not have to be about the event itself, it can be about gun control, its policies, the laws throughout the years, politicians in favor or against with their respective perspectives on the issue. The problem lies on us giving ratings to shows like the Kardashians. I am not saying stop watching the Kardashians if you love them, but try to give equal if not more attention to news affecting other people because ratings is what keeps news and with them, our knowledge alive. If we are informed about the context of an issue like a shooting, we keep the debate among the public alive. We are going to be actively paying attention to how the government reacts, what it does to prevent another situation like this, if it changes its policies etc. Countries that censorship content of media control the people’s thoughts and contain people from questioning the current administration. I think the only way we as a society can stop this events from being normalized is if we are informed enough to keep an active conversation about this events, through social media or face to face but if we are paying attention the government has to. And because the public’s interaction with the government involves us directly, we are more likely to constantly read the news. This will be a strong reason to keep news about shooting as headlines.

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  28. Jessica Sodowich

    I read something similar to your opening statement recently — if the country could label the shooter as an act of Islamic extremism, or some kind of threat to American nationalism, this country would be reeling, and raring to respond. Instead, it creates a platform to once again argue about gun control, only for the debating to go nowhere, and the victims and their loved ones will receive little to no reconciliation for their losses. No matter what PR campaigns, however strong they are, are born out of this bloodshed, there will be another strong campaign to face off against it. The chasms between Americans continue to grow wider, and it seems as though the only thing that could bring us together is an attack committed by foreign terrorists, with the chance to respond in violence.

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  29. Amina Antoury

    It is heartbreaking to see these stories of violent mass shootings happening every few months in the United States. In the United States, we have so many varied opinions about everything but even more so on gun control. I think the most a PR campaign could do, we would be to share their opinion on the situation and educate the public on why gun control is at the utmost importance at this time.

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  30. Jessica Dillard

    This is a tragic topic and one we should not have to discuss in the 21st century. Gun violence in this country is terrible and lawmakers are dragging their feet to change policies. I believe there can be a PR campaign to help persuade lawmakers to adopt common-sense and much-needed gun laws and inspire people to support them. The public needs to be educated on why it is important to have laws in place and how it can stop these incidents from happening. America is not the country it was 200+ years ago, we do not need guns for everyday life.

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  31. Megan Pohlman

    Gun control has been a big debate these past few years. In my opinion, I think there should be stricter laws so incidents such as the Las Vegas shooting, Boston marathon shooting and Virginia Tech shooting do not happen as often. It truly is only a matter of time until the headlines stop and this becomes just local news. I have high hopes for a “brilliant public relations campaign” to develop so we can live in a safer and stronger country.

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  32. Greg Liodice

    We are not going to move forward as a whole if we keep putting ourselves against each other. The only reason why we don’t move forward is because whenever one of us states an opinion, someone with a different point of view immediately jumps down their throat and there’s complete hostility amongst one another. There’s no one else to blame except our politicians, people in charge, the media, and celebrities. The perfect example was this writer claiming that people who didn’t agree with him were “idiots.”

    Incidents with what happened in Las Vegas are perfect examples of what not to do in response to an evil and senseless attack at our own people. Instead of coming together as one, we immediately jump at each others throats and complain about policy or other social issues. You’re right, I think we’re all angry. But let’s stop being angry at each other. We need to show how angry we are at those in charge, both on the Right and the Left. They’re the ones who aren’t allowing change because we can never meet in the middle anymore.

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  33. Aliyah

    Last week, I heard a speech by House Speaker Paul Ryan in which he said that we as Americans cannot let the actions of evil people change our values (i.e. the Constitution). That our identity and pride are manifested in our support of one another after these incidents. That this unity is what we must focus on.

    Sure, it’s important we support each other during tragedy and crisis , but this was a gross “spinning” of the issue and “changing of the conversation.” Refocusing attention to unity and away from gun reform is not what we need at this moment. Suggesting that we commend ourselves for our response to tragedy, rather than push for prevention, is only perpetuating the problem. There’s no reason to wait for this to happen again before more regulation is implemented.

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  34. Kristina Barry

    I think your opening statement was really striking. The issue of mass-shootings in the U.S. is a huge on-going problem and the government has not done anything about it. I understand the idea of people wanting to own guns for issues like protection, hunting, etc., but these guns are getting into the hands of the wrong people and innocent people are paying the consequences for it. Exactly how the U.S. would retaliate against a terrorist attack, something needs to be done about this major issue we face at home, Americans killing Americans. It is becoming too common and before our people become numb to the problem, change needs to happen fast.

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  35. Unice Kim

    I think we can all agree that what happened in Las Vegas was a tragedy. It is making headlines because mass shootings like this don’t happen everyday thus making it breaking news. It is scary to think about the future in a world where mass shootings might become a common thing. I also found it interesting that if a non American did this we would probably declare war. I never thought about this. Because an American with no suspicious background did this it makes it a tricky situation for some people.

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  36. Ian Budding

    Andy Borowitz is absolutely right; this country truly is exhausting. Just when you think there’d be something drastically changed in this country’s gun policy after a mass shooting, the absolute least is done to solve the problem. I definitely thought something would change after Sandy Hook, especially since I grew up five minutes from where it happened. I had never seen a community so distraught and torn; being within the same county and vicinity where the massacre occurred was a life-altering event. I know for a fact that I’m not the same because of it. But just when everybody around me and myself thought something would surely be changed after it happened, it’s now almost five years later and things haven’t changed. The Second Amendment has caused just enough harm as it’s done good. When something will finally be changed seems lightyears away.

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  37. Kaitlyn Cusumano

    I believe that regardless of any incident that occurs, as horrendous as they might be, when it comes to peoples second amendment rights many people become defensive from either side. Also, I think when it comes to an issue such as gun control people often want to associate and show alliance to which ever political side they lean toward rather than what truly makes the most sense for everyone. I would hope that we never come to a point where shootings or terrorist attacks become as common as car accidents.

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  38. Rosaria Rielly

    In the world we live in today, mass shootings and horrific events have become more and more prevalent and these events have not been taking as seriously as they should be because of how frequent they happen. The second amendment is a very controversial topic and there is a disconnect between those who support it and those who believe that there should be more laws and regulations in place. In order for all these horrific events to stop becoming more frequent and before people start to not put as much concern and empathy in the devastation that occurs, the gun laws need to be tighter and more there need to be stricter qualifications in order for someone to have the right to carry a gun. There is also a disconnect between the horrific events that happen here in America as they are American vs. American, whereas if we as a country were being attacked by other countries everyone would automatically assume terrorism and would immediately want precautions to be in place to prevent further devastation. As a country, there needs to be stronger regulations in place for people having the rights to carry weapons in order to prevent the horrific events that have been happening as becoming common instances in our everyday lifes.

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  39. Delaney Barac

    It is a heartbreaking realization that no matter how much gun violence occurs in the USA, no one is willing to implement change. It is disgusting that politicians send their condolences to victims and their families by sending out tweets saying they are “praying for them” or “so sorry”, yet they do not change ANY laws that could have potentially saved the victims lives. We do not live in a country of idiots and everyone should know that if we implemented some stricter regulations, our country would be a much safer place. At only nineteen years of age, I have been alive for the four deadliest shootings in United States History. Something has to change and it has to change now.

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  40. claudiabarnard

    After each mass shooting the United States has, people are becoming more and more used to receiving the awful news. Hearing about a shooting is becoming just as normal as hearing about a kidnapping or car accident. Mass shootings are becoming normalized in today’s society and just as the United States has evolved and changed over the years, laws need to as well. Guns need to be regulated and the United States needs to have stricter rules if there is any hope to stop mass shootings. We are all Human, imagine losing your brother, sister, mother, father, etc. in a shooting. Action needs to be taken before mass shootings become the norm.

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  41. Jazmin

    It always comes back to the question, “What makes headlines?” My grandmother, Ramona Pons, once told me reading the DMV book teaches one how to drive. It has the rules and regulations. I believed her. When I got my first SUV at the age of 27, a Cadillac Escalate, a gift from my boyfriend, her warnings were front and center in my mind. When my mother’s mother was sick with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, it was time to get behind the wheel, alone, and combat my fear.

    From Lindenhurst, I reached the Throggs Neck Bridge back drenched in sweat. Not to mention, the faux pas made at the bridge’s toll booth where I thought the woman told me to back up despite the large sign, “DO NOT BACK UP”. I shook with fright. A Yonkers born but Bronx raised young woman driving alone after years of relying on NYC transit and then the LIRR was so scary.

    The point is like driving, gun ownership is not a right, despite how the Second Amendment reads. Like drunk drivers who get pulled over and arrested, or in the case of this mad man, gun owners (hate them or love them) must stop regarding their collections as a means to an end, when “they see fit”.

    This is the problem, like with drivers, you don’t know who hands you pass a weapon or set of keys. Both guns and cars are weapons. Stephen King’s, “Mr. Mercedes” novel discussing this very act. In their town, the news was all over the story. Yet, in the non-fiction world car fatalities are national headlines. You may find a spread in Time magazine showing the faces of victims, as they done in 2003 or 2004, where Time showed you all the women killed by their partner. I cried looking at their faces. If it wasn’t for Time magazine, I’d never see faces, just statistics.

    Why does the media focus on the horrendous crimes committed with guns and not the fatalities caused by cars? Professor Morosoff writes true, we are a nation where car fatalities is the norm and we’ve somehow become numb to the numbers.

    http://edition.cnn.com/2008/LIVING/personal/05/29/o.lifesaving.lesson/
    My husband was on scene and helped coax little Katie’s head from her mother’s arms. Why did this happen? She was killed by a drunk driver, a love sick young man engulfed in his own pain. Maybe had he went home and blew his brains out, little Katie, now in high-school, would be planning homecoming and enjoying her crush. No, her little spirit exists someone where else.

    Could gun owners benefit from education just as drivers who take risks each time they hit the highway? Luckily for me, my background includes safe gun handling and yes I own guns. Not for hunting or harming others but because of my marriage and I was raised with guns in the house. There’s a respect for what they can do and never taken for granted. I do thank those listed my house as a, “gun owned location” because you made robbers less likely to come here. That was smart! Thanks.

    Back to topic: I don’t know the solution to the problem, especially when guns end up in the hands of men who massacre families at a country concert, or a gay club. Somehow education, psychiatric or someone with knowledge of the person should notify the police.

    Maybe background checks must go deeper to include in-person evaluations before a sale is complete. Maybe using the 5w’s who, what, where, when and why should apply to gun sales. I don’t know. What I do know is not all gun owners are crude or irresponsible. Put a gun in the wrong hands and it’s a matter of time before fatalities strikes.

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  42. Abby

    The second amendment right is a controversial issue. Many Americans support this right. Most Americans don’t abuse this right. However, if we don’t regulate the distribution of guns and do in depth background checks these type of mass shootings will become more common. We can’t let these mass shootings become the “norm.” It is unacceptable to think that instances like this will become as common as a robbery or a car accident. We as citizens in America need to know that being a part of this country is a privilege and you should treat this country and the people in it as a big community that helps each other. These types of events should not spark more people to do them, really it should do the opposite, it should put a red flag up in peoples minds and make them realize this has to stop. If we are going to continue as a stronger country we have to regulate the situation starting from the distribution of weapons.

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  43. Ana G Canahuate Torres

    I believe there is a sense of disconnection between the public and these horrific events that are sadly becoming second nature. The public needs to be educated on their surroundings and how events like the Las Vegas shooting cannot be seen as something normal, on the contrary it is a tragedy that is repeating itself in different forms. Even if they pass a law regarding stricter rules to regulate the access of violent weapons, would be a positive step in order to build some conciousness on the public.

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