Crock-Pot cRisis

      46 Comments on Crock-Pot cRisis

(Warning: This post contains spoilers about the latest episode of NBC’s “This Is Us.”)

It’s safe to say the folks at Crock-Pot never saw THIS coming…

Fans of the award-winning hit NBC series “This Is Us” have known since season one that Jack Pearson (played by Milo Ventimiglia) dies tragically; they just didn’t know how. Its audience later learned he loses his life in a fire. They now know what started it: a defective Crock-Pot.

CNN Media spelled it out: “In the the final scene of Tuesday night’s episode viewers watch him clean the kitchen after a Super Bowl celebration…but after he leaves the room the pot shorts out and sets the house on fire. The final shot is Jack’s face when the blaze reaches his bedroom… After the show, heartbroken fans on Twitter expressed their anger at the product for the death of the character.”

Milo Ventimiglia as Jack (Photo: Ron Batzdorff/NBC)

Many followers tweeted they were throwing out their Crock-Pots and parent company Newell Brands lost 24 percent of its stock value the day after the show’s broadcast. Crock-Pot opened a Twitter account for the first time to respond to the growing public relations crisis.

The company’s official statement read: “For nearly 50 years with over 100 million Crock-Pots sold, we have never received any consumer complaints similar to the fictional events portrayed in last night’s episode. In fact, the safety and design of our product renders this type of event nearly impossible.” The company added in a Twitter response, “We’re heartbroken over last night’s episode, too! But don’t worry, you can still make your favorite meals in your with confidence. We want to assure all consumers we rigorously test our products for safety.”

“If the backlash doesn’t die down soon, Crock-Pot may need NBC and ‘This Is Us’ to intervene more vocally,” said Andrew Gilman, founder of crisis communications firm CommCore Consulting Group. I agree; NBC should probably show Crock-Pot some love.

PR crises often happen suddenly and can come from unlikely places. While it wasn’t the network’s intention to disparage this venerable product, it has created a real problem for the Crock-Pot brand. If you were handling PR for NBC–or Crock-Pot–how would you respond? Your thoughts?

46 thoughts on “Crock-Pot cRisis

  1. Adam Engel

    I think that the viewers for this show went off the deep end with this one. Yes, NBC should of told crockpot that this is whats going to happen, so be wear. Many household items could somehow malfunction and cause a fire but crockpot released a statement that talks about how their company always tests their products and there has been no records of an incident like the show had. I liked the way that crockpot handled the crisis.

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  2. Daniella Opabajo

    This article, in particular, sparked my interest because I am originally from the Washington D.C. area and I would love to work in D.C. after graduation. The only downside to working within the PR industry in D.C. is the fact that most PR jobs center around politics. Other than government and political jobs within PR most industry that hire PR people are startups which have their pro and cons too. I find that during my job search that D.C. has not fully immersed in the PR sector yet. Many jobs have the title of “marketing associate” or “communications liaison.” Because of this I definitely see myself working in New York or maybe even the west coast, where I can potentially break into broader industries.

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  3. Anonymous

    This article, in particular, sparked my interest because I am originally from the Washington D.C. area and I would love to work in D.C. after graduation. The only downside to working within the PR industry in D.C. is the fact that most PR jobs center around politics. Other than government and political jobs within PR most industry that hire PR people are startups which have their pro and cons too. I find that during my job search that D.C. has not fully immersed in the PR sector yet. Many jobs have the title of “marketing associate” or “communications liaison.” Because of this I definitely see myself working in New York or maybe even the west coast, where I can potentially break into broader industries.

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  4. Aisha Buchanan

    With the NBC’s hit show having the hearts and eyes of many every week, NBC should’ve saw something like this coming. Of course , NBC didn’t know this exact reaction was going to happen but NBC should’ve known that the killing of a favorite character was going to lead to some outrage. and that the outrage was going to be linked to how he was killed. This situation proves the power in good TV shows and what it will have people do. NBC didn’t tell people to stop buying crockpots but because it was the reason why one of the audience’s favorite characters vanished, it caused an outrage.

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    1. Summer

      Im currently watching Season 1 of This is Us so I respectfully decline to go into depth of reading this particular blog post. Sorry Professor Morosoff. Rather I will discuss how brands benefit from brand placement in television shows. Hip Hop culture is a major proponent of encouraging product placement in hip hop music videos. Recently P Diddy’s Ciroc and Dr. Dre’s Beats headphones have been consistently featured in hip hop music videos. This product placement in music videos is excellent marketing and PR. Viewers associate a glamorous experience with that product and believe they’ll engage in that experience if they purchase that product. Viewers will also gain this feeling of being closer to that artist or social influencer. This drives sales especially among millennials and Generation Z.

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  5. Stacyann Nathan

    I do not believe the intention of the show “This is us” was to stop people from using crockpots. I believe they used as way to give a different way to how someone can die besides the typical killing and murder. As someone who does not the tv show I think people need to relax. Its unfortunately crockpot is going through this crisis that was definitely not planned and unforeseeable. However, I believe that crockpot might sue NBC which then intern give NBC a crisis.

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  6. Emily DiLaura

    I actually find this “crisis” comical, because the majority of the people watching “This Is Us” are parents who have probably been scared of their children finding video games to be too real, yet that’s exactly what is happening with this outrage. The viewers can’t seem to separate fact with fiction, and it has led to an out-of-nowhere issues for Crock-Pot, who did nothing wrong. Crock-Pots have been around for way longer than I’ve been alive, and with their products being something that you leave on, and leave the house, I am sure they do, as they say, rigorously test their products for fire safety. If I worked in communications for Crock-Pot, I would reach out to NBC and This Is Us and set up a commercial with the cast, or a “PSA” type video where they address what happened, but in a comical way in order to show, kind of as their tweet does, that they stand with the fans of the show, but also behind they product.

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  7. Emanuelle Souffrant

    if i was PR for Crock-Pot i wouldn’t blow NBC up because its just a show but i would bring it to their attention that they may not use my brand anymore if they won’t , 1st get my permission because i know for sure if Crock-Pot knew what NBC was going to do with they’re band they wouldn’t have let them use it in the show ,and second not slander my brand. I feel like crisis’s like this need to be handled in a fragile way because if not the Crock-Pot brand as a whole would be in jeopardy.

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  8. Ai Ren

    If I am the PR who handling the Crock-Pot, I would sue the NBC. They mislead people’s thoughts. In “This is us”, Jack Pearson lost his life in a fire and the cause of the fire is a defective Crock-Pot. The audience will directly relate the Crock-Pot in the TV show within the reality. I will ask NBC to make an apology letter to the public that announces the pot in “This is us” has nothing to do with the Crock-Pot. Also, they should compensate the loss they occurred. Meanwhile, the PR will continue the interaction with people on Twitter, soothing people’s emotions and win back the trust of the consumers.

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  9. Owen Lewis

    I understand that this is irrelevant to my answer, but I think the viewers of this show (and others) who were outraged by the fictional scene are obtuse. Unfortunately that would not be an acceptable response. Crock-Pot took the most effective route (social media) to reach out to stakeholders and sent out a great message, citing history and statistics (nearly 50 years, over 100 million products). NBC should also speak up, but I imagine the response to NBC would then be, “how could you kill a favorite character through an impossible means?!” Some incredible times we live in.

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  10. Danielle Drop

    In all honesty, I believe “This Is Us” is at fault more than Crock-Pot. They (unintentionally, I hope) threw the product under the bus without real thought as to the potential crisis Crock-Pot faces now. I’m impressed that the company decided to launch a Twitter account in response to the backlash. Even more, I appreciate the light humor expressed in their tweet and their appraisal of the show. As for NBC, I would deem it more than appropriate to release some kind of statement, even in as simple a form as a response tweet, to verify they meant no harm to the company and the situation portrayed on television was strictly fictional.

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  11. Bryn Poli

    I’m a big fan of the show and my family are loyal viewers and we were sad that a common household item we use caused the death of a beloved character. After reading the response from the company I feel assured that they are perfectly safe and a malfunction isn’t inevitable but just a plot device. Many household items could somehow malfunction and cause a fire but crockpot explains that there company tests their products and they haven’t had an incident like the show had. It was unfortunate that NBC didn’t warn crockpot of their inclusion in Jack’s death but I think crockpot did a great job of crisis control as soon as they could.

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  12. Rikki Glazer

    I thought this was a really interesting view on the Crock Pot situation on the show This is Us. I have never seen the show nor have I used a crock pot. It is good that the Crock Pot company is being proactive about the situation by using their social media to explain that the plot line is not realistic. However, it would be helpful for the tv show should mention that crock pot products do not really cause situations like what occurred in the episode.

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  13. Christian Santos

    I’m actually really surprised the way Crock-Pot responded to this situation. They managed to draft an appropriate, level-headed response to something that really shouldn’t have been thrust in their laps. Throwing the blame on NBC or the writers of “This Is Us” is what one would expect, considering the company lost a great deal of stock over the death of a fictional character. Had Crock-Pot said something even slightly negative or disparaging, they could’ve angered even more fans. That being said, I do expect Crock-Pot to say something about the writing of that episode, perhaps unofficially and not on social media to keep the enraged fans from doing more damage. Someone was really not thinking straight when they wrote that episode, because now Crock-Pot has more than enough motivation to sue. Regardless of who died in the episode (and I haven’t seen the show yet, so it really doesn’t matter to me), it shouldn’t have been a Crock-Pot that started it all. Whoever is responsible for the development of that episode should’ve realized the kind of catastrophe this would cause. I agree that NBC should probably “show Crock-Pot some love”. It was highly unnecessary to negatively involve Crock-Pot in any shape or form without its consent, and it would do well to foster better relations between the two companies. Based on what I’ve taken from the situation, it doesn’t seem to me that Crock-Pot deserved this kind of treatment.

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  14. Andrew Gagnon

    It’s very shocking that one tragic scene in NBC’s “This Is Us” caused Crock-Pot’s stock to fall 26%. Personally, I believe that the fans took this a little too far in having a television program cause them to throw out perfectly good Crock-Pots. NBC is definitely responsible for Crock-Pot’s sudden crisis and should be held accountable. It was not necessary to have it specifically be a Crock-Pot instead of a more generic product. It will be interesting to see how Crock-Pot’s PR team will be able to turn this around. They’ve done a good job in creating a Twitter profile to begin to deal with all of the backlash.

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  15. John Potito

    Despite the backlash I feel that Crock-Pot response has been right on the money. They’ve been coming across as fans of the show sharing empathy to Jack’s supposed death in all of their statements; while being clear and logical about making clear the product is designed against exactly that. In a way they have embraced the crisis rather than “counter attack”. Which is why I don’t think Crock-Pot will sue so long as NBC aids in the damage control. The show’s creator has already publicly shown support for Crock-Pot; asking fans to realize the slow cooker used in the show is fictional. In my opinion I see a path where this can be used to produce good publicity for the brand. For one; it is clear that, although the Crock-Pot caused the fire, it is still unclear how Jack dies, and if the fire is even the direct cause. On thing that’s clear is that, when characters die on the show, they give them one hell of a send-off. The show has made plenty of sharp left turns after setting up expectations (Jack driving drunk to the bar anyone?), and there’s still a matter of Kate’s guilt in her father’s death. If Jack goes out like an absolute superhero dad, then after a period of grieving fans will look back at the moment fondly. The positive association will bleed onto Crock-Pot and they will be “immortalized” as being associated with Father of the Century Jack Pearson. On the other hand, if Crock-Pot decides to make a legal battle, then it will be all to easy for them to be always negatively associated with the show. Though, based on their current actions, I feel their PR team is very capable of turning this in their favor.

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  16. John Potito

    Despite the backlash I feel that Crock-Pot response has been right on the money. They’ve been coming across as fans of the show sharing empathy to Jack’s supposed death in all of their statements; while being clear and logical about making clear the product is designed against exactly that. In a way they have embraced the crisis rather than “counter attack”. Which is why I don’t think Crock-Pot will sue so long as NBC aids in the damage control. The show’s creator has already publicly shown support for Crock-Pot; asking fans to realize the slow cooker used in the show is fictional. In my opinion I see a path where this can be used to produce good publicity for the brand. For one; it is clear that, although the Crock-Pot caused the fire, it is still unclear how Jack dies, and if the fire is even the direct cause. On thing that’s clear is that, when characters die on the show, they give them one hell of a send-off. The show has made plenty of sharp left turns after setting up expectations (Jack driving drunk to the bar anyone?), and there’s still a matter of Kate’s guilt in her father’s death. If Jack goes out like an absolute superhero dad, then after a period of grieving fans will look back at the moment fondly. The positive association will bleed onto Crock-Pot and they will be “immortalized” as being associated with Father of the Century Jack Pearson. On the other hand, if Crock-Pot decides to make a legal battle, then it will be all to easy for them to be always negatively associated with the show. Though, based on their current actions, I feel their PR team is very capable of turning this in their favor.

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  17. Jae J.

    I think that as a company (Crock Pot) that it is kind of interesting that the backlash from a TV show is what made them open up a twitter account. As a brand in 2018, having any of the top social media accounts is necessary. As mentioned in class before, if they didn’t pay for product placement then I don’t really see where they would have any winning case against NBC/This Is Us. If the network and show were to intervene and issue a statement that the scene was completely “made up” has never happened to anyone that works on the show, I don’t think that would change anything. A shortage can happen with any electrical product whether or not they haven’t had complaints before; it would be best for Crock Pot to open and honest about possible dangers but also ensure that their latest and past models are up to safety standards.

    In short: I would let it pass and see what happens from there.

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  18. Tierney Hall

    I’m honestly surprised that Newell Brands was not consulted about the use of their product before This Is Us took the liberty to use it as a cause of a dramatic death. Although I think that the response from viewers who threw out their crock pots and sold stock in the brand were being a tad bit dramatic, a popular show like This Is Us can cause a big impact and this should have been thought about. I have a strong feeling that it will die down quickly as people begin to cope with the episode but Newell Brands for sure took an unexpected hit with the careless, seemingly innocent use of their product in a widely watched television show.

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  19. Natalie Brooker

    As someone who has never seen ‘This is Us’, but who is a lover of soups and stews in the winter, my heart breaks for the beloved Crock-Pot brand. As it has happened many times before, and will continue to occur, people are being extremists on the internet. At one point in time it was Republicans smashing their Keurigs after the company pulled advertisements from the ‘Hannity’ show, and people all over the world debating whether the dress was really blue and black rather than white and gold. Unfortunately, Crock-Pot is the latest victim of the internet, which is harming the company economically. Fortunately, these “twitterstorms” which are caused by a sudden flurry of activity about a specific topic on Twitter, often blow over quickly, as people turn their attention to another media scandal. In that, there is hope for Crock-Pot. The brand did the correct PR tactic in releasing a statement on the same platform in which they were being criticized, highlighting that this fictional incident has never occurred in a household to their knowledge. However, this episode has had a financial impact on the company, which is completely unnecessary. NBC should do the ethical thing by releasing a statement about how this event is entirely fictional. The network could even potentially turn this PR disaster into a tool- purchasing a large amount of Crock-Pots and distributing them to lucky fans of ‘This is Us’. NBC has an obligation to respond to this issue.
    At the end of the day, after this ‘beef’ has been squashed, we can have solace in going back to using the internet to watch cat videos, rather than attack Crock-Pot, in which I use to make a mean Chili.

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  20. Brennan Erlandsen

    I think it’s quite amazing that this oversight was not edited in the writer’s room. You’d think with a network as big as NBC, that they would be able to say, ‘hey, we’re a pretty popular show, maybe Crock Pot will be pissed at this.” Crock Pot can now sue for damages to their stocks and shareholders. Why This Is Us didn’t just say there was a gas leak or faulty wiring is odd. Maybe they wanted to be original and think of a fire starter that has never been used on TV before. Furthermore, they could’ve have just said a kitchen cooking appliance started the fire. NBC will probably have to do some kind of damage control to the Crock Pot situation, whether it is a fire safety commercial or just a written statement.

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  21. Andrea Bilton

    I think it is really unfortunate that the “This is Us” scene resulted in so much backlash against Crock Pot. Clearly, it is a fictional story and they didn’t cause any actual fires or deaths. I would understand if the negative reactions turned out to be people joking around on Twitter, but hearing that Crock Pot’s stock took a nose dive made me realize that people are taking this all too seriously. However, if the “This is Us” writers had a plan to spark controversy for promotion, they are definitely succeeding. I have never heard of the show until you brought it up in class, and I feel like this entire event could have a hidden marketing agenda. The Crock Pot scene could have been planted in order to rile up fans on social media, and thus spread curiosity about the show and cause more people to tune in. If this is the case, then that is pretty intelligent of the writers, despite proving to be detrimental to Crock Pot.

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  22. Emily Wong

    I’m surprised that the fans reactions to the “This is Us” episode caused Crock-Pot’s parent company to lose twenty-four percent of its stock value. I understand the grief of losing a beloved character in a TV show, but to wind up hurting a brand in real life is a little ridiculous. It was a bad move for the writers to have the cause of death of Jack to be caused by a kitchen product that is almost solely known by its brand name. If the fire was caused by a gas stove, the fans of the show wouldn’t turn to hating a specific brand of stoves. If that were the case there wouldn’t be such a huge deficit in a company’s stock value. Crock-Pot did, however, handle the situation nicely be taking to social media, to ensure that there hasn’t been a Crock-Pot related fire and that the company actively tests the safety of there products. Hopefully, Crock-Pot can recover quickly.

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  23. Anonymous

    I’m honestly surprised that this turned out to be so catastrophic for Newell Brands. We see gas ovens, fireplaces and a variety of other household appliances become the causes of fire-related tragedies in movies and TV shows but it rarely (at least as far as I am aware) results in such a serious PR crisis as this. I find it especially interesting because the show is fictional and not based on events that actually transpired. That being said – as unusual as this situation may be, I don’t believe it’s going to prove severe in the long term for this company. This is not likely to be an occurrence that many people will remember a year from now. Even if it does become more serious for the company – I feel that a PSA issued by NBC about the safety of Crock-Pots and the fictional nature of the events in the show would be more than enough to repair the the reputation of the company and their product and would catalyze the recovery of lowered stock values.

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  24. Madeline Myslow

    As a “This Is Us” (and specifically Jack Pearson) fanatic, I’ll admit that my knee-jerk reaction was to be angry at Crock-Pot for being the reason my favorite character died on the show. Now, I would not have taken it to the extreme and thrown my mom’s Crock-Pot away, but it would certainly have made me rethink leaving one on overnight or when we weren’t in the house. However, as usual, the internet had an overly dramatic reaction to something on television, and went and ruined the Crock-Pot name overnight. The fact of the matter is, I would bet that 90% that said they were throwing out their devices either didn’t even use them to begin with or didn’t actually throw them out. However, I certainly understand the company’s dismay at its stock plummeting, and for that I believe NBC or at least the writers of the show should release some sort of statement about how the incident is completely fictional and that everyone should be safe in their homes with their Crock-Pots. At this point, there is not much that the Crock-Pot company can do besides start to advertise the safety of their products (although I’ve never seen a Crock-Pot ad before so I’m assuming they wouldn’t have a very big advertising budget to put the ad out). Any way you look at it, NBC should recognize the issue they are causing and take steps to make it right.

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  25. Courtney Shapiro

    I believe NBC should make a statement claiming that the events on the television show are purely fictional. It would help to better Crock Pot’s image and would allow people to lower their concerns. Crock Pot should also continuously reassure people that the appliance is safe to use. I don’t believe NBC had a vendetta against the crock pot, and the reaction from the consumers was most likely blown out of proportion. I also don’t believe there has to be any battles fought. NBC should apologize for portraying Crock Pot in a negative light, but there is no reason to bring on a lawsuit.

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  26. Kathryn Harley

    By portraying Crock-Pot in such a negative light, it is obvious that this is a product of poor writing on the part of NBC. By name dropping a specific brand of slow-cooker, NBC is vulnerable to being brought to court for damages. Crock-Pot could respond by issuing an advertising campaign poking fun at the incident while also insuring that customers are aware of the safety precautions taken in the manufacturing of the product. Through social media, Crock-Pot has the opportunity to turn this negative media attention into a means of promoting the safety and effectiveness of their product. NBC should issue a statement clarifying that the incident that took place was a dramatization and would most likely not occur in real life in order to appease fans of the show and possibly ease the blow Crock-Pot took to sales.

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  27. Emily Green

    I believe that Crock-Pot handled the public outlash well. Honestly, I find the fact that there has been this much outlash toward the company based in this show quite overwhelming. Just because something happens in a TV show doesn’t make it accurate and true. Crock-Pots are quite common in many households and I find it quite ridiculous that people are willing to throw away an expensive household object just because of something that happened with your favorite TV show. As for NBC, I do believe they should comment on the situation so the Crock-Pot company is not damaged any further. In addition, they could have easily avoided this situation if they didn’t use the name Crock-Pot. NBC could have easily just not shown the name.

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  28. Christina Shackett

    It is obvious that the intention of “This Is Us” was not to get its viewers to turn against Crockpot. However, due to the dramatic backlash on Crockpot’s image, I think that it would be ethical on the part of This Is Us to make a disclaimer that they did not base the plot on any truth behind Crockpot functionality. Crockpot itself, I believe, handled the situation as best as they could – assuring that they weren’t against This Is Us for the scene, but also. ensuring that their products had little to no reported issues. A case like this goes to show PR is needed as a result of the most unexpected reactions.

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  29. Christyann Martinez

    I think the Crock-pot company handled this situation perfectly. The only thing they can really do is reassure their consumers that the product is safe and remind them that it was a fictional event in a fiction tv show. Any further actions, such as pressing charges against NBC, would only proceed to make crockpot look guilty of having unsafe products. Overall I think this issue will be forgotten very quickly and I doubt crockpot will face serious long term damage from this.

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  30. Danny Nikander

    I think the company handled the situation as well as they could. Their statement got to the point and assured everyone that there was no actual issue with CrockPots. The additional response on Twitter was a nice touch because it almost poked fun at the situation, making it a light-hearted misunderstanding. In doing so, they did a good job at not attacking the show or people that believed this, but stuck to the fact that their product does no harm to anyone and that there is nothing to worry about.

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  31. Tia Di Salvo

    While I agree that viewers may be acting histrionic in response to the situation, Crock Pot is feeling their effect head on. As you mentioned in our class, following the episode’s air date, Crock Pot stock fell 26%.

    When I did a little more research, I thought that the company’s response to the crisis was clever. Besides releasing a statement that discussed the assured quality and level of safety of their products, Crock Pot created a Twitter handle, @CrockPotCares to handle backlash on the platform while concurrently creating a new channel to push out content. @CrockPotCares also promises to deliver “special offers, delicious tips, and helpful hints” according to the account’s bio. The account is only a few days old and has only 24 tweets, but I’m intrigued to see how the company is able to incorporate this account into their brand development. It’s also important to note that the company does not have an official Twitter account, so it is a possibility that this negative situation can have something good come out of it.

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  32. Courtney Grieco

    Like most crises, the “This Is Us” Crock Pot crisis will soon be a thing of the past. However, it is unfortunate that Crock Pot is having to defend themselves in response to a fictional scenario that Crock Pot states has never happened to real-life customers. I think it was a good idea that Crock Pot opened a twitter account and is taking action. Hopefully “This Is Us” lovers will soon realize the fiction of the Crock Pot fire and that NBC won’t have to get involved.

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  33. Amanda Kruse

    This is interesting because it shows how powerful an audience’s connection with the characters can be, even when they know the show is fictional. People began to blame crock-pot for the loss of their favorite character instead of the writers. This PR crisis probably came as a huge shock to Crock-pot, forcing them to act fast without any preparation. I think they did a good job releasing the statement that Crock-pot has never had an issue like this and that it is tested for safety, but I think NBC needs to do more on their part in making up for this mistake. They caused Crock-pot to lose a lot of money and never even warned them about the use of the product on their show. They should release a statement showing their appreciation for the company.

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  34. Jason Abdow

    While I do not expect the damage from “This Is Us” to last, it is shocking just how much damage a fictional television show could have on a company’s business. If I were handling the PR for Crock-Pot I would continue to do what they have already been doing. Friendly tweets and responses, showing that their products are safe and always have been is an easy way to react in a way people will see. As for NBC, I think having someone from the show make a sincere comment about the fictitious nature of the episode would be smart and not draw too much attention unless Newell Brands continues to struggle in its stocks.

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  35. Jessica Vespa

    It is interesting how the tragic death of a fictional character on a fictional program can upset viewers enough for them to blame a well-renowned household appliance that is used by many nationwide. Quite honestly, I would say the backlash has been taken too far in that it is effecting the financial status of an actual brand. The recent controversy surrounding Crock-Pot, which could have been easily avoided by the network’s producers, is blatantly unfair. However, since the damage has already been done, I would say NBC ought to own up to their production slip-up by simply stating how the network did not intend to tarnish the reputation of the product. On the other hand, the actions taken by Crock-Pot in regards to defending themselves via social media are a step in the right direction, and they should continue to defend the product (without putting down the program) until the backlash subsides. With the next episode airing this weekend, hopefully heartbroken viewers will accept this fictitious tragedy and let the “Crock-Pot Controversy” come to an end.

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  36. Kayla Scordo

    I feel that the whole situation could have been avoided if NBC did not use the brand name Crockpot and used slow cooker. I do not believe that Crockpot should take any responsibility considering the company has never had never had a real life issue like this. I think that NBC should publicly apologize to Crockpot for the use of the product without permission and then presenting the product in a negative light. I think the characters death my have been avoided with a proper safety plan.

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  37. Jazz Graham

    I feel as though the public is overreacting and should learn to separate a fictional television series from reality. However, considering we can not directly force people to recognize the difference between fiction and reality, PR tactics can be used to at least somewhat sway the minds of the general public. If I was handling PR for NBC, I would stay quiet on the subject in hopes of avoiding provoking a lawsuit. On the other hand, if I was handling PR for Crock Pot, I would do exactly what the Crock Pot brand is doing right now; creating social media accounts to address the slander. The best way to get around this situation in my opinion, is to stay fairly quiet and let the situation die down because, the public has shown time and time again that small crises like this will be forgotten especially for a name brand that has been a successful family favorite for decades. This situation is only temporary.

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  38. DaisyMae VanValkenburgh

    Even though this whole situation was probably not meant to be blown out of proportion as it was, I think there is some major damage control that has to be done. It is not just the fact that customers are upset and think that their Crock-Pots are going to cause this same accident as it did on the show, but the fact that Crock-Pot is being financially hurt in the stock market, is definitely something to fight against. I believe that Crock-Pot should fight NBC’s “This is Us” for slander, or at least fight out this situation in court to earn Crock-Pot their good name back. I think “This is Us” has to join the conversation before any of this can get better. “This is Us” has to explain their side, so that Crock-Pot doesn’t just look like the bad guys trying to fight for their good side. “This is Us” and NBC need to explain how the product was just used because it is a common household item and it worked within the scene, and in no way was it supposed to cause the incident that it has. If I were running PR for Crock-Pot I would definitely reach out to NBC and try to come up with some sort of resolution and make an official announcement when the conclusion was made.

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  39. Alora Grant

    I feel that the just as the program’s plot has to be approved by a network, the producers and writers of put a disclaimer in the show about the crockpot not actually being a defective product. However, knowing that the show is a drama, fans should not have jumped to the conclusion that Crockpot products are defective when they know that there is a need for some type of harm in the story in order to move the events along (and essentially cause the death). Because of the fans’ reactions, NBC should release a public statement apologizing to the Crockpot company for harming their sales.

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  40. Liane Sousa

    The writers of the hit NBC show “This Is Us” and the company of Crock-Pot should file a joint statement or possibly a Superbowl commercial informing Americans the importance of fire safety and the correct procedures of evacuating from a house fire; following this Sunday’s dramatic episode reveal. As Jack’s death could have been prevented with the proper fire safety evacuation in the Pearson home. Jack’s death encourages Americans to plan a fire safety evacuation in their very homes.

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  41. Mike Marti

    Although it was not the intention of the network to give the product a bad image, I believe that the NBC should hold themselves to a certain standard and come forward with some sort of public acknowledgement and apology concerning the situation. It was their content that caused the crisis for Crock-Pot and the least they could do is help them fix the problem and control the situation. While, I do believe that consumers are kind of going a bit insane over this situation, seeing as the entire crisis was birthed by the death of a fictional character on a television show, NBC could have avoided putting the Crock-Pot name under all this fire by just calling the kitchen appliance a slow-cooker, instead of using a brand name. We can’t blame the American viewer/consumer for being impressionable, but companies can take action and attempt to fix the problems presented as a result of said impressionability.

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  42. Gracen Hansen

    I think that the plot would not be altered if the writers of “This Is Us” would have substituted “slow cooker” rather than naming a brand. Because there was a drop in the Crock Pot stock, Crock Pot has every right to sue the station for slander. NBC, probably hoping that “any press is good press”, over looked how this would effect another company. NBC should release a statement that Crock Pot crock pots do not burst into flames.

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  43. Nicole Finocchio

    I believe NBC should release a statement saying that the death of the character does not reflect any actual events. The network should also restate some of the facts that Crock-Pot mentioned in its own statement to emphasize the true quality of the appliance. This statement will show that “This Is Us” was not trying to ruin the Crock-Pot name. The Twitter accounts of NBC, “This Is Us”, and the show’s actors should retweet some of Crock-Pot’s tweets about this situation so that their followers know the Crock-Pot is still a trusted kitchen appliance. These actions will show the public and Crock-Pot that NBC is cleaning up the mess they unintentionally started.

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  44. Zachary Hanby

    Crock-Pot has a chance to capitalize on their flash in the spotlight. Although stock plummeted, it will surely bounce back as America has the attention span of a goldfish. Crock-Pot made a twitter account and a few social media savvy employees could use some lighthearted humor to turn this misplaced anger into a larger following on social media. Crock-Pot should take ownership of this fictional death, crack a few jokes about the matter over Twitter, and suddenly Crock-Pot builds a fan base of people who have little to no interest in Crock-Pot, akin to other company Twitter accounts such as MoonPie and Wendy’s. The stock market is twitchy, and many will abandon ship at the first sign of trouble, but with the right PR team, this could be an opportunity.

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  45. Jeremy

    The response from viewers of the show seems to be a little overboard. A common household item managed to play a part in the death of a character on television. But with the response from the company itself assuring that each crockpot is tested for safety and that there have been no problems in years past, viewers should feel more safe and secure for the next time they use a crockpot. And if the viewers don’t trust it, they should keep an eye on it when it is in use and leave a fire extinguisher in the kitchen.

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